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Grow Heathrow: a Lockean analysis

Grow Heathrow: a Lockean analysis
Grow Heathrow: a Lockean analysis
On 29 June 2017, Judge Marc Dight authorised the eviction of a community project established on a derelict market garden site to protest against the third runway at Heathrow Airport. Dight’s reasoning was that ‘private landowner [is] entitled to put its land to any form of lawful use, including doing nothing with it’. Using the arguments of John Locke in what some may see as a counter-intuitive way, this paper offers a critique of the judgement based on the principles of avoiding spoilage, leaving enough and as good for others and improving land through the application of labour. I will also examine the specific question of land which is neglected to the point that it is detrimental to the well-being of those around it and provide a counter to the overall anti-expropriation sentiment found in Locke’s work. Although the analysis in this article focuses on a specific paradigm case, it could have wider implications, which will be explored near the end of the article.
Locke, Environment, Property
1369-8230
Harding, Eloise
148caca4-c812-4de2-9860-b50d35a6a001
Harding, Eloise
148caca4-c812-4de2-9860-b50d35a6a001

Harding, Eloise (2019) Grow Heathrow: a Lockean analysis. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy. (doi:10.1080/13698230.2019.1565565).

Record type: Article

Abstract

On 29 June 2017, Judge Marc Dight authorised the eviction of a community project established on a derelict market garden site to protest against the third runway at Heathrow Airport. Dight’s reasoning was that ‘private landowner [is] entitled to put its land to any form of lawful use, including doing nothing with it’. Using the arguments of John Locke in what some may see as a counter-intuitive way, this paper offers a critique of the judgement based on the principles of avoiding spoilage, leaving enough and as good for others and improving land through the application of labour. I will also examine the specific question of land which is neglected to the point that it is detrimental to the well-being of those around it and provide a counter to the overall anti-expropriation sentiment found in Locke’s work. Although the analysis in this article focuses on a specific paradigm case, it could have wider implications, which will be explored near the end of the article.

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Heathrow CRISPP Finalish - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 January 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 January 2019
Keywords: Locke, Environment, Property

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427356
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427356
ISSN: 1369-8230
PURE UUID: 8f852899-88c5-4b60-868f-c6522dab7fc8

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Date deposited: 14 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 16:46

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