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The production of polyphonic manuscripts in thirteenth-century Paris: new evidence for standardised procedures

The production of polyphonic manuscripts in thirteenth-century Paris: new evidence for standardised procedures
The production of polyphonic manuscripts in thirteenth-century Paris: new evidence for standardised procedures

Modern understanding of the production and dissemination of thirteenth-century polyphony is constrained by the paucity of manuscript sources that have been preserved in their entirety; the panorama of sources of medieval polyphony is essentially fragmentary. Some of the surviving fragments, however, were torn from lost books of polyphony that were to some extent comparable to well-known extant codices. The fragment of polyphony preserved in the binding of manuscript 6528 of the Biblioteca Nacional de Madrid is illustrative in this respect. This fragment displays a number of codicological and musical features that are strikingly similar to those of the Florence manuscript (F). Both sources share format and mise-en-page, make use of similar styles of script, notation and pen-work decoration,We wish to thank Mark Everist, Carmen Julia Gutiérrez and the anonymous reviewers of Early Music History for their invaluable comments and suggestions. Permission to reproduce the images has been graciously accorded by the Biblioteca Nacional de España (BNE) and Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo (MiBACT). The following library sigla are used: CH-SGs Sankt Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek D-GI Giessen, Universitätsbibliothek E-Mn Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España F-Pn Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France GB-Lbl London, British Library In addition, the Ars antiqua manuscripts mentioned in this article are indicated by their familiar sigla: F Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Pluteus 29.1 LoA London, British Library, Egerton 2615Ma Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España, 20486 W1 Wolfenbüttel, Herzog August Bibliothek, Cod. Guelf. 628 Helmst. transmit the pieces in the same order, and present virtually identical musical readings. The Madrid fragment thus provides new evidence for a standardised production of polyphonic books in thirteenth-century Paris. The study provides a detailed account of the fragment's codicological and philological features, and explores the hypothesis that it originated in the same Parisian workshop that produced F.

0261-1279
91-139
Bevilacqua, Gregorio
e93e3b18-7d1e-4da5-9fcd-e6b4637e1c2e
Catalunya, David
e617ede6-942a-4f33-aec4-9efba6166cca
Torres, Nuria
fb956b1f-e02f-453d-ae5c-9d06888b8664
Bevilacqua, Gregorio
e93e3b18-7d1e-4da5-9fcd-e6b4637e1c2e
Catalunya, David
e617ede6-942a-4f33-aec4-9efba6166cca
Torres, Nuria
fb956b1f-e02f-453d-ae5c-9d06888b8664

Bevilacqua, Gregorio, Catalunya, David and Torres, Nuria (2018) The production of polyphonic manuscripts in thirteenth-century Paris: new evidence for standardised procedures. Early Music History, 37, 91-139. (doi:10.1017/S0261127918000049).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Modern understanding of the production and dissemination of thirteenth-century polyphony is constrained by the paucity of manuscript sources that have been preserved in their entirety; the panorama of sources of medieval polyphony is essentially fragmentary. Some of the surviving fragments, however, were torn from lost books of polyphony that were to some extent comparable to well-known extant codices. The fragment of polyphony preserved in the binding of manuscript 6528 of the Biblioteca Nacional de Madrid is illustrative in this respect. This fragment displays a number of codicological and musical features that are strikingly similar to those of the Florence manuscript (F). Both sources share format and mise-en-page, make use of similar styles of script, notation and pen-work decoration,We wish to thank Mark Everist, Carmen Julia Gutiérrez and the anonymous reviewers of Early Music History for their invaluable comments and suggestions. Permission to reproduce the images has been graciously accorded by the Biblioteca Nacional de España (BNE) and Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo (MiBACT). The following library sigla are used: CH-SGs Sankt Gallen, Stiftsbibliothek D-GI Giessen, Universitätsbibliothek E-Mn Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España F-Pn Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France GB-Lbl London, British Library In addition, the Ars antiqua manuscripts mentioned in this article are indicated by their familiar sigla: F Florence, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Pluteus 29.1 LoA London, British Library, Egerton 2615Ma Madrid, Biblioteca Nacional de España, 20486 W1 Wolfenbüttel, Herzog August Bibliothek, Cod. Guelf. 628 Helmst. transmit the pieces in the same order, and present virtually identical musical readings. The Madrid fragment thus provides new evidence for a standardised production of polyphonic books in thirteenth-century Paris. The study provides a detailed account of the fragment's codicological and philological features, and explores the hypothesis that it originated in the same Parisian workshop that produced F.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 4 October 2018

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Local EPrints ID: 427377
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427377
ISSN: 0261-1279
PURE UUID: 5323e465-dc18-4a95-a59e-5c16fb7bac96

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Date deposited: 14 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 14 Jan 2019 17:30

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