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Spatial associations between household and community livelihood capitals in rural territories: an example from the Mahanadi Delta, India

Spatial associations between household and community livelihood capitals in rural territories: an example from the Mahanadi Delta, India
Spatial associations between household and community livelihood capitals in rural territories: an example from the Mahanadi Delta, India
Despite the increasing interest of the Sustainable Livelihood Framework in the field of international development and in academia and the recent call for the use of mixed-methods approach, there has been little analysis that brings together qualitative and quantitative methods over a large geographical extent. Based on findings from participatory rural appraisals during which participants identified the key assets needed to achieve their livelihoods, this paper argues that common-pool resources (community capitals) should be differentiated from private goods (household capitals) as they operate under different dynamics of decision-making and management. We then create quantitative indicators that can be mapped across a large geographical extent by using data derived from national census and satellite sensors. Spatial patterns and differentials in access to livelihood capitals across the case study are examined and the associations that exist between household capitals, between community capitals, and between both are quantified. The results demonstrate that household physical capital is positively associated with household financial and social capitals but negatively associated with household natural capital, supporting the hypothesis that households trade their natural assets to cope with shocks. It is also shown that proximity to main axes of communication increases access to village amenities but decreases access to natural resources, while remoteness increases household human capital but decreases household physical and financial capitals. Such a cross-scale study adds to the understanding of the question of scale regarding rural livelihoods and community development, which could act as a bridge between the implementation of policy programmes (often targeted at the community level) and their expected outcomes (often targeted at the household level).
spatial trade-offs, livelihoods, community capitals, household capitals, participatory rural appraisal, rural development, India
0143-6228
98-111
Berchoux, Tristan
73e8221a-e1e0-45e1-aefd-e604f0b05498
Hutton, Craig
9102617b-caf7-4538-9414-c29e72f5fe2e
Berchoux, Tristan
73e8221a-e1e0-45e1-aefd-e604f0b05498
Hutton, Craig
9102617b-caf7-4538-9414-c29e72f5fe2e

Berchoux, Tristan and Hutton, Craig (2019) Spatial associations between household and community livelihood capitals in rural territories: an example from the Mahanadi Delta, India. Applied Geography, 103, 98-111. (doi:10.1016/j.apgeog.2019.01.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Despite the increasing interest of the Sustainable Livelihood Framework in the field of international development and in academia and the recent call for the use of mixed-methods approach, there has been little analysis that brings together qualitative and quantitative methods over a large geographical extent. Based on findings from participatory rural appraisals during which participants identified the key assets needed to achieve their livelihoods, this paper argues that common-pool resources (community capitals) should be differentiated from private goods (household capitals) as they operate under different dynamics of decision-making and management. We then create quantitative indicators that can be mapped across a large geographical extent by using data derived from national census and satellite sensors. Spatial patterns and differentials in access to livelihood capitals across the case study are examined and the associations that exist between household capitals, between community capitals, and between both are quantified. The results demonstrate that household physical capital is positively associated with household financial and social capitals but negatively associated with household natural capital, supporting the hypothesis that households trade their natural assets to cope with shocks. It is also shown that proximity to main axes of communication increases access to village amenities but decreases access to natural resources, while remoteness increases household human capital but decreases household physical and financial capitals. Such a cross-scale study adds to the understanding of the question of scale regarding rural livelihoods and community development, which could act as a bridge between the implementation of policy programmes (often targeted at the community level) and their expected outcomes (often targeted at the household level).

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Accepted/In Press date: 11 January 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 January 2019
Published date: February 2019
Keywords: spatial trade-offs, livelihoods, community capitals, household capitals, participatory rural appraisal, rural development, India

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427519
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427519
ISSN: 0143-6228
PURE UUID: 9517bb70-39a7-49bf-8e87-b6b33433a1bf
ORCID for Craig Hutton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5896-756X

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Date deposited: 22 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:48

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