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Modeling skills for des and SD: an exploratory study on their development in new practitioners

Modeling skills for des and SD: an exploratory study on their development in new practitioners
Modeling skills for des and SD: an exploratory study on their development in new practitioners
This paper compares widely employed simulation modeling approaches: System Dynamics (SD) and Discrete Event Simulation (DES). SD and DES follow two quite different modeling philosophies and can bring very different but complimentary insights in understanding to the same ‘real world’ problem. An exploratory study is undertaken to investigate the ability of new practitioners to assimilate and then put into practice both modeling approaches. We found evidence that new practitioners can master both simulation techniques but they developed skills at representing the tangible characteristics of systems, the realm of DES, easier than conceptualizing the intangible properties of systems such as feedback
processes, the realm of SD. More emphasis should be made of helping new practitioners develop a deeper understanding of the links between the various stages of the modeling process, especially model conceptualization, as well as more practice in visualizing the conceptually difficult feedback processes so
vital in SD modeling.
IEEE Press
Kunc, Martin
0b254052-f9f5-49f9-ac0b-148c257ba412
Hoad, Kathryn
662a0518-30bb-4a81-9da8-10cf0bf8dafa
Kunc, Martin
0b254052-f9f5-49f9-ac0b-148c257ba412
Hoad, Kathryn
662a0518-30bb-4a81-9da8-10cf0bf8dafa

Kunc, Martin and Hoad, Kathryn (2015) Modeling skills for des and SD: an exploratory study on their development in new practitioners. In In Proceedings of the 2015 Winter Simulation Conference. IEEE Press. 8 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

This paper compares widely employed simulation modeling approaches: System Dynamics (SD) and Discrete Event Simulation (DES). SD and DES follow two quite different modeling philosophies and can bring very different but complimentary insights in understanding to the same ‘real world’ problem. An exploratory study is undertaken to investigate the ability of new practitioners to assimilate and then put into practice both modeling approaches. We found evidence that new practitioners can master both simulation techniques but they developed skills at representing the tangible characteristics of systems, the realm of DES, easier than conceptualizing the intangible properties of systems such as feedback
processes, the realm of SD. More emphasis should be made of helping new practitioners develop a deeper understanding of the links between the various stages of the modeling process, especially model conceptualization, as well as more practice in visualizing the conceptually difficult feedback processes so
vital in SD modeling.

Text
07408506 - Accepted Manuscript
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Published date: 6 December 2015

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Local EPrints ID: 427570
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427570
PURE UUID: d36ea05f-b710-4ddb-8add-30d8cc4e671b
ORCID for Martin Kunc: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3411-4052

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Date deposited: 23 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 12 Dec 2021 04:26

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Contributors

Author: Martin Kunc ORCID iD
Author: Kathryn Hoad

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