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Point-to-point repetitive control with application to drop-foot

Point-to-point repetitive control with application to drop-foot
Point-to-point repetitive control with application to drop-foot

Drop-foot is characterised by ankle dorsiflexion weakness, caused by either nerve damage or a result of a brain or spinal injury. It results in abnormal gait, producing slow, tiring and often unsafe ambulation. Established treatment is via passive orthoses, but these have high rejection rates caused by discomfort, loss of muscle control and ankle instability. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has had considerable success, but current commercial control approaches are open loop or triggered, and the few exisiting feedback approaches require extensive sensor data, lack accuracy, or are highly dependent on an identified model. This paper is the first application of repetitive control (RC) to this problem, providing improved gait performance by learning from errors over previous gait cycles. To address the drawbacks of previous approaches, a comprehensive extension to a general class of RC law is developed which enables it to track only isolated time points. Simulation results of the resulting 'point-to-point' RC framework on FES-assisted drop-foot confirm its improved convergence and robust performance properties.

2399-2404
IEEE
Page, A. P.
0c80d0ed-7cce-4346-8e85-8d63377ee58b
Freeman, C. T.
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Chu, B.
555a86a5-0198-4242-8525-3492349d4f0f
Page, A. P.
0c80d0ed-7cce-4346-8e85-8d63377ee58b
Freeman, C. T.
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Chu, B.
555a86a5-0198-4242-8525-3492349d4f0f

Page, A. P., Freeman, C. T. and Chu, B. (2018) Point-to-point repetitive control with application to drop-foot. In 2018 European Control Conference, ECC 2018. IEEE. pp. 2399-2404 . (doi:10.23919/ECC.2018.8550097).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Drop-foot is characterised by ankle dorsiflexion weakness, caused by either nerve damage or a result of a brain or spinal injury. It results in abnormal gait, producing slow, tiring and often unsafe ambulation. Established treatment is via passive orthoses, but these have high rejection rates caused by discomfort, loss of muscle control and ankle instability. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has had considerable success, but current commercial control approaches are open loop or triggered, and the few exisiting feedback approaches require extensive sensor data, lack accuracy, or are highly dependent on an identified model. This paper is the first application of repetitive control (RC) to this problem, providing improved gait performance by learning from errors over previous gait cycles. To address the drawbacks of previous approaches, a comprehensive extension to a general class of RC law is developed which enables it to track only isolated time points. Simulation results of the resulting 'point-to-point' RC framework on FES-assisted drop-foot confirm its improved convergence and robust performance properties.

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More information

Published date: 27 November 2018
Venue - Dates: 16th European Control Conference, ECC 2018, Limassol, Cyprus, 2018-06-12 - 2018-06-15

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427608
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427608
PURE UUID: e4d27f35-4f12-42d6-9be5-150f7932a845
ORCID for B. Chu: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2711-8717

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:42

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