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Effect of rail dynamics on curve squeal under constant friction conditions

Effect of rail dynamics on curve squeal under constant friction conditions
Effect of rail dynamics on curve squeal under constant friction conditions

Curve squeal noise is a severe railway noise problem that can occur when a railway vehicle negotiates a sharp curve. It is usually characterised by a very loud tonal noise and can be very annoying for people in the vicinity. It is generally attributed to friction-induced instability, either due to a falling friction characteristic with increasing sliding velocity or to a mode coupling mechanism which can lead to instability even for a constant friction coefficient. The squeal frequency is usually associated with one or more wheel modes. However, the wheel is coupled dynamically to the track and insufficient attention has been paid in previous research to the role played by the rail dynamic behaviour. In this paper, the effect of the rail dynamics on curve squeal under constant friction conditions is investigated by means of different modelling approaches. The rail is firstly modelled using a waveguide finite element (WFE) model and it is found that the inclusion of the rail dynamics in the model can lead to squeal in some situations where it would otherwise not occur. Various effects are then considered that may introduce additional resonant behaviour into the rail dynamics. These include the effect of the rail cross mobility, rail cross-section deformation, the influence of the periodic support of the rail and reflections between multiple wheels on the rail. The effect of the rail pad stiffness is also explored. However, the results show that all these factors have little influence on the predicted curve squeal instabilities. By means of a reduced model, the main characteristics of the rail dynamics that can result in squeal are then assessed. It is shown that the mass and damping-like behaviour of the infinite rail are at the origin of the instabilities rather than any modal behaviour of the track. Curve squeal may occur for a single wheel mode even if the rail is represented by a damper, which is a close approximation to the vertical mobility of the track at high frequencies. This forms a third possible mechanism for curve squeal in addition to falling friction and wheel mode coupling.

Curve squeal, Eigenvalue analysis, Mode coupling, Multiple wheels, Rail cross-section deformation
0022-460X
183-199
Ding, Bo
06d00a3c-671c-4cab-953c-b9f1c8d8eed9
Squicciarini, Giacomo
c1bdd1f6-a2e8-435c-a924-3e052d3d191e
Thompson, David
bca37fd3-d692-4779-b663-5916b01edae5
Ding, Bo
06d00a3c-671c-4cab-953c-b9f1c8d8eed9
Squicciarini, Giacomo
c1bdd1f6-a2e8-435c-a924-3e052d3d191e
Thompson, David
bca37fd3-d692-4779-b663-5916b01edae5

Ding, Bo, Squicciarini, Giacomo and Thompson, David (2019) Effect of rail dynamics on curve squeal under constant friction conditions. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 442, 183-199. (doi:10.1016/j.jsv.2018.10.027).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Curve squeal noise is a severe railway noise problem that can occur when a railway vehicle negotiates a sharp curve. It is usually characterised by a very loud tonal noise and can be very annoying for people in the vicinity. It is generally attributed to friction-induced instability, either due to a falling friction characteristic with increasing sliding velocity or to a mode coupling mechanism which can lead to instability even for a constant friction coefficient. The squeal frequency is usually associated with one or more wheel modes. However, the wheel is coupled dynamically to the track and insufficient attention has been paid in previous research to the role played by the rail dynamic behaviour. In this paper, the effect of the rail dynamics on curve squeal under constant friction conditions is investigated by means of different modelling approaches. The rail is firstly modelled using a waveguide finite element (WFE) model and it is found that the inclusion of the rail dynamics in the model can lead to squeal in some situations where it would otherwise not occur. Various effects are then considered that may introduce additional resonant behaviour into the rail dynamics. These include the effect of the rail cross mobility, rail cross-section deformation, the influence of the periodic support of the rail and reflections between multiple wheels on the rail. The effect of the rail pad stiffness is also explored. However, the results show that all these factors have little influence on the predicted curve squeal instabilities. By means of a reduced model, the main characteristics of the rail dynamics that can result in squeal are then assessed. It is shown that the mass and damping-like behaviour of the infinite rail are at the origin of the instabilities rather than any modal behaviour of the track. Curve squeal may occur for a single wheel mode even if the rail is represented by a damper, which is a close approximation to the vertical mobility of the track at high frequencies. This forms a third possible mechanism for curve squeal in addition to falling friction and wheel mode coupling.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 October 2018
Published date: 3 March 2019
Keywords: Curve squeal, Eigenvalue analysis, Mode coupling, Multiple wheels, Rail cross-section deformation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427732
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427732
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: 68927521-c0b0-439d-9935-8a8380f4fda0
ORCID for Giacomo Squicciarini: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2437-6398
ORCID for David Thompson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7964-5906

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:16

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