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Examining the transferability of the educational components of a successful american school for accelerated gifted children to the Saudi context

Examining the transferability of the educational components of a successful american school for accelerated gifted children to the Saudi context
Examining the transferability of the educational components of a successful american school for accelerated gifted children to the Saudi context
Acceleration is essential intervention for gifted students, as it allows them to reduce the time and effort required by learning at a faster pace than typical. Saudi Arabia has recently implemented a grade skipping policy for gifted students as part of the gifted provision options offered by the Ministry of Education. The Saudi policy allows gifted students in fourth grade (age ten) to move to the sixth grade (age twelve), and from the seventh grade (age thirteen) to the ninth grade (age fifteen). However, a clear policy for acceleration at tertiary level education was not included, so the fate of those accelerated students after school is still ambiguous. Currently, these measures do not meet global criteria or the Saudi Vision 2030 plan, which aims to provide educational opportunities no matter what the students’ level, and improve the learning environment to stimulate creativity and innovation.

In order to meet global criteria and the needs of accelerated students in transition to university, this study aimed to explore the educational components of one successful American school for gifted students that has applied a university-based programme for accelerated students. This study questioned: What are the key educational components of a highly acclaimed American school specialising in accelerated programmes for gifted students? In addition, from the perspective of educational experts in Saudi Arabia, to what extent could these components be transferred and applied within the Saudi educational system?

This qualitative study was divided into two stages: Stage One was a case study conducted at a successful school in the USA, and Stage Two was conducted in Saudi Arabia. The study utilised three approaches to data collection: in the US, document analysis, semi-structured interviews with the seven US school staff, and observations; and in Saudi Arabia, semi-structured interviews with ten Saudi experts in the field of gifted education.

The findings revealed six main components required to establish an appropriate intervention for accelerated students, namely, educational setting, leadership and personnel, identification process, programmes, counselling services, and curriculum. Two of these components are transferable to the Saudi context and four are subject to conditions such as enhancing the policy of acceleration in Saudi Arabia. However, language, culture and competition between organisations are challenges that may affect the transferability of these components from one context to a totally different context. However, this study provided a model and recommendations that can fit with the Saudi educational system.
University of Southampton
Bin Yousef, Jawaher Hamad
2bec6ecf-7d67-4427-bfb8-a7825586e5ad
Bin Yousef, Jawaher Hamad
2bec6ecf-7d67-4427-bfb8-a7825586e5ad
Kinchin, Gary
04cfb5e4-89a6-479a-9426-8534944436a4

Bin Yousef, Jawaher Hamad (2018) Examining the transferability of the educational components of a successful american school for accelerated gifted children to the Saudi context. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 363pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Acceleration is essential intervention for gifted students, as it allows them to reduce the time and effort required by learning at a faster pace than typical. Saudi Arabia has recently implemented a grade skipping policy for gifted students as part of the gifted provision options offered by the Ministry of Education. The Saudi policy allows gifted students in fourth grade (age ten) to move to the sixth grade (age twelve), and from the seventh grade (age thirteen) to the ninth grade (age fifteen). However, a clear policy for acceleration at tertiary level education was not included, so the fate of those accelerated students after school is still ambiguous. Currently, these measures do not meet global criteria or the Saudi Vision 2030 plan, which aims to provide educational opportunities no matter what the students’ level, and improve the learning environment to stimulate creativity and innovation.

In order to meet global criteria and the needs of accelerated students in transition to university, this study aimed to explore the educational components of one successful American school for gifted students that has applied a university-based programme for accelerated students. This study questioned: What are the key educational components of a highly acclaimed American school specialising in accelerated programmes for gifted students? In addition, from the perspective of educational experts in Saudi Arabia, to what extent could these components be transferred and applied within the Saudi educational system?

This qualitative study was divided into two stages: Stage One was a case study conducted at a successful school in the USA, and Stage Two was conducted in Saudi Arabia. The study utilised three approaches to data collection: in the US, document analysis, semi-structured interviews with the seven US school staff, and observations; and in Saudi Arabia, semi-structured interviews with ten Saudi experts in the field of gifted education.

The findings revealed six main components required to establish an appropriate intervention for accelerated students, namely, educational setting, leadership and personnel, identification process, programmes, counselling services, and curriculum. Two of these components are transferable to the Saudi context and four are subject to conditions such as enhancing the policy of acceleration in Saudi Arabia. However, language, culture and competition between organisations are challenges that may affect the transferability of these components from one context to a totally different context. However, this study provided a model and recommendations that can fit with the Saudi educational system.

Text
Jawaher Alyousef thesis 08 11 2018 - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only until 30 November 2021.
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.

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Published date: September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427734
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427734
PURE UUID: 7cc235f3-f638-4153-b8dd-6adb9fb20109

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Date deposited: 25 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 17:49

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