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A conceptual model of riparian forest restoration for natural flood management

A conceptual model of riparian forest restoration for natural flood management
A conceptual model of riparian forest restoration for natural flood management

There is an increasing emphasis on using natural processes, including riparian forest restoration, to enhance the ecological, hydrological and geomorphological functioning of watercourses. However, we have insufficient knowledge on how the supply and retention of in-channel wood from riparian forest stands changes with age, with inferences typically based on data from terrestrial forests. This presents a challenge in estimating the efficacy and functional lifespan of restoration projects. In this paper, we use a riparian forest growth model to show there is a lag of up to 40–50 years between the start of forest growth and trees delivering wood to the channel that is large enough to resist fluvial transport, anchor logjams and so increase channel complexity and hydraulic resistance. Resource managers need to account for realistic timescales over which changes promoted by riparian woodland restoration will occur and may need to consider using interim engineered logjams as the forest develops.

ecohydrology, forest, large wood, natural flood management, restoration
1747-6585
Dixon, Simon J.
529605d7-3b00-4612-95d3-bfdbe8cbacc0
Sear, David A.
ccd892ab-a93d-4073-a11c-b8bca42ecfd3
Nislow, Keith H.
ae1aac29-3e79-4882-9461-e70a36b8a4dc
Dixon, Simon J.
529605d7-3b00-4612-95d3-bfdbe8cbacc0
Sear, David A.
ccd892ab-a93d-4073-a11c-b8bca42ecfd3
Nislow, Keith H.
ae1aac29-3e79-4882-9461-e70a36b8a4dc

Dixon, Simon J., Sear, David A. and Nislow, Keith H. (2018) A conceptual model of riparian forest restoration for natural flood management. Water and Environment Journal. (doi:10.1111/wej.12425).

Record type: Article

Abstract

There is an increasing emphasis on using natural processes, including riparian forest restoration, to enhance the ecological, hydrological and geomorphological functioning of watercourses. However, we have insufficient knowledge on how the supply and retention of in-channel wood from riparian forest stands changes with age, with inferences typically based on data from terrestrial forests. This presents a challenge in estimating the efficacy and functional lifespan of restoration projects. In this paper, we use a riparian forest growth model to show there is a lag of up to 40–50 years between the start of forest growth and trees delivering wood to the channel that is large enough to resist fluvial transport, anchor logjams and so increase channel complexity and hydraulic resistance. Resource managers need to account for realistic timescales over which changes promoted by riparian woodland restoration will occur and may need to consider using interim engineered logjams as the forest develops.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 September 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 October 2018
Keywords: ecohydrology, forest, large wood, natural flood management, restoration

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427738
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427738
ISSN: 1747-6585
PURE UUID: 5ef2efcf-a9de-4600-8619-8454a4f9f673
ORCID for David A. Sear: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0191-6179

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:37

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