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Defining dementia: social and historical background of Alzheimer disease

Defining dementia: social and historical background of Alzheimer disease
Defining dementia: social and historical background of Alzheimer disease
Though Alzheimer disease (AD) has been recognized as a distinct entity since 1907, scientific understanding of, and public interest in, the disease remained very limited until the 1970s. The perception of AD as a significant problem has been substantially affected by cultural and demographic changes and by interest group and federal government initiatives. The recognition of AD has transformed senility from an expected stage of life into a "disease." It has also increased fear both of the individual effects of having AD and of the social consequences of AD in the population. Both the biotechnology industry and AD activist organizations will play a role in the social implications of genetic testing for AD.
1090-6576
13-19
Fox, P.J.
84f5bb1c-3daa-4de6-bed0-3efc5b234dac
Kelly, S.E.
84a661e7-2037-4051-9f3c-b7fdf77c2e69
Tobin, S.L.
a45599e9-ff23-4741-8d7e-9fb5bff324ff
Fox, P.J.
84f5bb1c-3daa-4de6-bed0-3efc5b234dac
Kelly, S.E.
84a661e7-2037-4051-9f3c-b7fdf77c2e69
Tobin, S.L.
a45599e9-ff23-4741-8d7e-9fb5bff324ff

Fox, P.J., Kelly, S.E. and Tobin, S.L. (1999) Defining dementia: social and historical background of Alzheimer disease. Genetic Testing, 3 (1), 13-19.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Though Alzheimer disease (AD) has been recognized as a distinct entity since 1907, scientific understanding of, and public interest in, the disease remained very limited until the 1970s. The perception of AD as a significant problem has been substantially affected by cultural and demographic changes and by interest group and federal government initiatives. The recognition of AD has transformed senility from an expected stage of life into a "disease." It has also increased fear both of the individual effects of having AD and of the social consequences of AD in the population. Both the biotechnology industry and AD activist organizations will play a role in the social implications of genetic testing for AD.

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Published date: 1999

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 42776
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/42776
ISSN: 1090-6576
PURE UUID: c66e71b1-baab-4c8d-93c3-e20fbda8bc05

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Date deposited: 24 Jan 2008
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 21:11

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