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Thematic issue: driving automation and autonomy

Thematic issue: driving automation and autonomy
Thematic issue: driving automation and autonomy

Automated driving has the potential to support drivers, freeing them up to do other things, such as work, rest or play. The problem is that in the present instantiation, automated driving requires the driver to perform a monitoring function and be ready to intervene if required. This is the worst of all worlds of automation. The monitoring task can be (if performed properly) more demanding than manual driving and the driver is not freed up to do other things. Worse still, is that the monitoring task cannot be sustained for long and, on occasions, led to a vehicle collisions because the driver cannot intervene in a timely manner. One of the first studies conducted over twenty years shows this to be the case and there really has not been any improvements since. This special issue reports on the latest development in vehicle automation and points to future directions that research should be directed.

Attention, Automation, Autonomy, Driving, Workload
1463-922X
1-8
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Stanton, Neville A. (2019) Thematic issue: driving automation and autonomy. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 1-8. (doi:10.1080/1463922X.2018.1541112).

Record type: Editorial

Abstract

Automated driving has the potential to support drivers, freeing them up to do other things, such as work, rest or play. The problem is that in the present instantiation, automated driving requires the driver to perform a monitoring function and be ready to intervene if required. This is the worst of all worlds of automation. The monitoring task can be (if performed properly) more demanding than manual driving and the driver is not freed up to do other things. Worse still, is that the monitoring task cannot be sustained for long and, on occasions, led to a vehicle collisions because the driver cannot intervene in a timely manner. One of the first studies conducted over twenty years shows this to be the case and there really has not been any improvements since. This special issue reports on the latest development in vehicle automation and points to future directions that research should be directed.

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EDITORIAL - Driving Automation and Autonomy - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 January 2019
Keywords: Attention, Automation, Autonomy, Driving, Workload

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427823
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427823
ISSN: 1463-922X
PURE UUID: 3a4c04bc-6bfd-4196-a2b9-7a7278404826
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 08 Oct 2020 04:07

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