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The capability of shock tubes to simulate primary blast injury loading

The capability of shock tubes to simulate primary blast injury loading
The capability of shock tubes to simulate primary blast injury loading
Blast injuries and fatalities caused by anti-personnel (AP) landmines are an enduring issue that pose a threat to both military and civilians around the world. It is estimated that over 100 million active landmines exist globally, with civilians being injured at least as frequently as military personnel. Resulting lower-extremity injuries often require amputation, causing significant financial and social stress on already vulnerable individuals and families. As an increasing problem in both military and civilian practice, there is a growing need to investigate and understand the complex loading mechanisms underlying blast injury. Realistic generation of such shock waves and characterization of blast load transfer is fundamental to developing effective blast injury models, protective measures and mitigation. Shock tubes are versatile apparatus capable of generating pressure pulses of various intensities and durations to simulate different blast environments. Simulating such blast effects within a laboratory environment is particularly useful for blast injury research in comparison to costly high explosive (HE) trials that typically require specialist facilities. This presentation presents initial results from a programme of experimental work that aims to examine how shock tubes can be employed as a tool for investigating primary blast injuries and the extent to which they can reproduce injurious blast environments corresponding to realistic blast threats.
Denny, Jack
7bd3e650-6c4e-4149-b408-2166e377b216
Dickinson, Alexander
10151972-c1b5-4f7d-bc12-6482b5870cad
Critchley, Richard
e2b9904e-97ee-4dca-b55e-bddc3b635f9b
Denny, Jack
7bd3e650-6c4e-4149-b408-2166e377b216
Dickinson, Alexander
10151972-c1b5-4f7d-bc12-6482b5870cad
Critchley, Richard
e2b9904e-97ee-4dca-b55e-bddc3b635f9b

Denny, Jack, Dickinson, Alexander and Critchley, Richard (2018) The capability of shock tubes to simulate primary blast injury loading. In Conference Proceedings of the 3rd Japan-US Technical Information Exchange Forum on Blast Injury (JUFBI 2018).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Blast injuries and fatalities caused by anti-personnel (AP) landmines are an enduring issue that pose a threat to both military and civilians around the world. It is estimated that over 100 million active landmines exist globally, with civilians being injured at least as frequently as military personnel. Resulting lower-extremity injuries often require amputation, causing significant financial and social stress on already vulnerable individuals and families. As an increasing problem in both military and civilian practice, there is a growing need to investigate and understand the complex loading mechanisms underlying blast injury. Realistic generation of such shock waves and characterization of blast load transfer is fundamental to developing effective blast injury models, protective measures and mitigation. Shock tubes are versatile apparatus capable of generating pressure pulses of various intensities and durations to simulate different blast environments. Simulating such blast effects within a laboratory environment is particularly useful for blast injury research in comparison to costly high explosive (HE) trials that typically require specialist facilities. This presentation presents initial results from a programme of experimental work that aims to examine how shock tubes can be employed as a tool for investigating primary blast injuries and the extent to which they can reproduce injurious blast environments corresponding to realistic blast threats.

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More information

Published date: 2018
Venue - Dates: Japan-US Technical Information Exchange Forum on Blast Injury (JUFBI) 3rd Annual Symposia, Japan, 2018-05-09 - 2018-05-11

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427834
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427834
PURE UUID: 7a9c92bb-72ad-4e55-8490-c9d7b5871afe
ORCID for Jack Denny: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3181-4747
ORCID for Alexander Dickinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9647-1944

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 09 May 2020 00:43

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Contributors

Author: Jack Denny ORCID iD
Author: Richard Critchley

University divisions

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