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Transforming the Effectiveness and Relevance of Blast Injury Research

Transforming the Effectiveness and Relevance of Blast Injury Research
Transforming the Effectiveness and Relevance of Blast Injury Research
Blast injuries are a world-wide problem and are a serious threat to people often in the poorest countries. In 2016, almost 9,000 casualties were caused by landmines and other explosive devices but the real number is thought to be much higher. Most of these casualties (78%) were civilians, of which 42% were children [1]. Blast injuries are usually very serious, requiring many operations and long-term medical care. Research is important to improve prevention and treatments, plus help to understand the global and local picture of blast injuries. Blast injury research has received increased interest and funding in recent years. However, much of the current funding and research is focused on defence even though most victims are civilians. In times where funding is limited we must use the available resources in the best possible way. It is important that we understand what research has been done and how it can be used to improve protection and healthcare. Our vision is to make sure that blast injury research is relevant and useful so it can address the health issues caused by blast injuries and ensure that funding is spent wisely. We will bring together a range of skills and knowledge to evaluate and create an evidence-base that can be used to ensure that future blast injury research targets important areas to best improve the health and protection of those most at risk.
[1] International Campaign to Ban Landmines - Cluster Munition Coalition (ICBL-CMC). (2017) ‘Landmine Monitor 2017 - Annual Report’.
Brown, Rebecca
a4912e7b-0056-4d4d-843d-3baf69f97f58
Denny, Jack
7bd3e650-6c4e-4149-b408-2166e377b216
Brown, Rebecca
a4912e7b-0056-4d4d-843d-3baf69f97f58
Denny, Jack
7bd3e650-6c4e-4149-b408-2166e377b216

Brown, Rebecca and Denny, Jack (2019) Transforming the Effectiveness and Relevance of Blast Injury Research. Fourth Annual Fortisnet Meeting: A Collaboration Toolkit, Southampton, United Kingdom. 24 Jan 2019.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Other)

Abstract

Blast injuries are a world-wide problem and are a serious threat to people often in the poorest countries. In 2016, almost 9,000 casualties were caused by landmines and other explosive devices but the real number is thought to be much higher. Most of these casualties (78%) were civilians, of which 42% were children [1]. Blast injuries are usually very serious, requiring many operations and long-term medical care. Research is important to improve prevention and treatments, plus help to understand the global and local picture of blast injuries. Blast injury research has received increased interest and funding in recent years. However, much of the current funding and research is focused on defence even though most victims are civilians. In times where funding is limited we must use the available resources in the best possible way. It is important that we understand what research has been done and how it can be used to improve protection and healthcare. Our vision is to make sure that blast injury research is relevant and useful so it can address the health issues caused by blast injuries and ensure that funding is spent wisely. We will bring together a range of skills and knowledge to evaluate and create an evidence-base that can be used to ensure that future blast injury research targets important areas to best improve the health and protection of those most at risk.
[1] International Campaign to Ban Landmines - Cluster Munition Coalition (ICBL-CMC). (2017) ‘Landmine Monitor 2017 - Annual Report’.

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Published date: 2019
Venue - Dates: Fourth Annual Fortisnet Meeting: A Collaboration Toolkit, Southampton, United Kingdom, 2019-01-24 - 2019-01-24

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427835
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427835
PURE UUID: c79a0043-773a-46a9-a573-51bdeff760e3
ORCID for Rebecca Brown: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5825-6859
ORCID for Jack Denny: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3181-4747

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:31

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Contributors

Author: Rebecca Brown ORCID iD
Author: Jack Denny ORCID iD

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