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Morphological and chemical evidence for cyclic bone growth in a fossil hyaena

Morphological and chemical evidence for cyclic bone growth in a fossil hyaena
Morphological and chemical evidence for cyclic bone growth in a fossil hyaena

Trace element inventories are known to correlate with specific histological structures in bone, reflecting organismal physiology and life histories. By studying trace elements in fossilised bone, particularly in individuals with cyclic bone growth (alternating fast/slow bone deposition), we can improve our understanding of the physiology of extinct organisms. In this study we present the first direct comparison between optical histology (bone tissue identification) and synchrotron-based chemical mapping, quantification, and characterisation of trace elements (biochemistry) within cyclic growth tissues, in this case within bones of a cave hyaena (Crocuta crocuta spelaea). Results show distributions of zinc, an element strongly associated with active ossification and bone growth, correlating with (1) fast-growing tissue of zonal bone (cyclic growth) in an extinct hyaena and (2) secondary osteons (remodelling) in both extant and extinct hyaena. Concentrations and coordination chemistry of zinc within the fossil sample are comparable to those seen in extant bone suggesting that zinc is endogenous to the sample and that the chemistry of bone growth has been preserved for 40 ka. These results demonstrate that the study of trace elements as part of the histochemistry has wide utility for reconstructing growth, diet and other lifestyle factors in archaeological and fossil bone.

0267-9477
2062-2069
Anné, Jennifer
042e9bc2-5b64-4096-ba82-87a419f7226f
Wogelius, Roy A.
1996a44f-6aa1-4bd0-9ecb-5a80d3c6e90e
Edwards, Nicholas P.
ce26b666-59e8-4eb8-b3cb-a30e6d30668e
Van Veelen, Arjen
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Buckley, Michael
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Sellers, William I.
c3daedff-29a2-4909-8509-8b04d124cbd8
Bergmann, Uwe
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Sokaras, Dimosthenis
726cbe7e-3a6f-436d-8521-9eedd9a360cf
Alonso-Mori, Roberto
ff622600-2587-4ea9-bcb3-20087f637850
Harvey, Virginia L.
da2eae32-899f-4446-be61-21ab64de7c48
Egerton, Victoria M.
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Manning, Phillip L.
988586b4-568b-4e51-93c2-5114bfbd2abc
Anné, Jennifer
042e9bc2-5b64-4096-ba82-87a419f7226f
Wogelius, Roy A.
1996a44f-6aa1-4bd0-9ecb-5a80d3c6e90e
Edwards, Nicholas P.
ce26b666-59e8-4eb8-b3cb-a30e6d30668e
Van Veelen, Arjen
cb6f2c8b-4671-4836-88a0-3987fd2f2d67
Buckley, Michael
e860f5f2-fcd7-4ba2-b289-52e2a71d1f03
Sellers, William I.
c3daedff-29a2-4909-8509-8b04d124cbd8
Bergmann, Uwe
39ba49dd-5163-4bb8-9ad7-678f50c40365
Sokaras, Dimosthenis
726cbe7e-3a6f-436d-8521-9eedd9a360cf
Alonso-Mori, Roberto
ff622600-2587-4ea9-bcb3-20087f637850
Harvey, Virginia L.
da2eae32-899f-4446-be61-21ab64de7c48
Egerton, Victoria M.
264c5cdd-4837-4a7c-9602-e60a200d43df
Manning, Phillip L.
988586b4-568b-4e51-93c2-5114bfbd2abc

Anné, Jennifer, Wogelius, Roy A., Edwards, Nicholas P., Van Veelen, Arjen, Buckley, Michael, Sellers, William I., Bergmann, Uwe, Sokaras, Dimosthenis, Alonso-Mori, Roberto, Harvey, Virginia L., Egerton, Victoria M. and Manning, Phillip L. (2018) Morphological and chemical evidence for cyclic bone growth in a fossil hyaena. Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 33 (12), 2062-2069. (doi:10.1039/c8ja00314a).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Trace element inventories are known to correlate with specific histological structures in bone, reflecting organismal physiology and life histories. By studying trace elements in fossilised bone, particularly in individuals with cyclic bone growth (alternating fast/slow bone deposition), we can improve our understanding of the physiology of extinct organisms. In this study we present the first direct comparison between optical histology (bone tissue identification) and synchrotron-based chemical mapping, quantification, and characterisation of trace elements (biochemistry) within cyclic growth tissues, in this case within bones of a cave hyaena (Crocuta crocuta spelaea). Results show distributions of zinc, an element strongly associated with active ossification and bone growth, correlating with (1) fast-growing tissue of zonal bone (cyclic growth) in an extinct hyaena and (2) secondary osteons (remodelling) in both extant and extinct hyaena. Concentrations and coordination chemistry of zinc within the fossil sample are comparable to those seen in extant bone suggesting that zinc is endogenous to the sample and that the chemistry of bone growth has been preserved for 40 ka. These results demonstrate that the study of trace elements as part of the histochemistry has wide utility for reconstructing growth, diet and other lifestyle factors in archaeological and fossil bone.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 October 2018
Published date: 1 December 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427890
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427890
ISSN: 0267-9477
PURE UUID: d7bb19ef-dcfa-4a42-a91d-e4f522677ee2

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Date deposited: 01 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 01 Feb 2019 17:30

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Contributors

Author: Jennifer Anné
Author: Roy A. Wogelius
Author: Nicholas P. Edwards
Author: Arjen Van Veelen
Author: Michael Buckley
Author: William I. Sellers
Author: Uwe Bergmann
Author: Dimosthenis Sokaras
Author: Roberto Alonso-Mori
Author: Virginia L. Harvey
Author: Victoria M. Egerton
Author: Phillip L. Manning

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