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Migrant Britain: histories and historiographies: essays in honour of Colin Holmes

Migrant Britain: histories and historiographies: essays in honour of Colin Holmes
Migrant Britain: histories and historiographies: essays in honour of Colin Holmes

Britain has largely been in denial of its migrant past - it is often suggested that the arrivals after 1945 represent a new phenomenon and not the continuation of a much longer and deeper trend. There is also an assumption that Britain is a tolerant country towards minorities that distinguishes itself from the rest of Europe and beyond. The historian who was the first and most important to challenge this dominant view is Colin Holmes, who, from the early 1970s onwards, provided a framework for a different interpretation based on extensive research. This challenge came not only through his own work but also that of a 'new school' of students who studied under him and the creation of the journal Immigrants and Minorities in 1982. This volume not only celebrates this remarkable achievement, but also explores the state of migrant historiography (including responses to migrants) in the twenty-first century.

Taylor and Francis
Craig-Norton, Jennifer
34ba2a25-fdd6-4c25-ae56-be607f8612c9
Hoffmann, Christhard
cfb17105-98d4-4e5d-9c6a-e61414cee793
Kushner, Tony
958c42e3-4290-4cc4-9d7e-85c1cdff143b
Craig-Norton, Jennifer
34ba2a25-fdd6-4c25-ae56-be607f8612c9
Hoffmann, Christhard
cfb17105-98d4-4e5d-9c6a-e61414cee793
Kushner, Tony
958c42e3-4290-4cc4-9d7e-85c1cdff143b

Craig-Norton, Jennifer, Hoffmann, Christhard and Kushner, Tony (eds.) (2018) Migrant Britain: histories and historiographies: essays in honour of Colin Holmes , 1st ed. London. Taylor and Francis, 344pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

Britain has largely been in denial of its migrant past - it is often suggested that the arrivals after 1945 represent a new phenomenon and not the continuation of a much longer and deeper trend. There is also an assumption that Britain is a tolerant country towards minorities that distinguishes itself from the rest of Europe and beyond. The historian who was the first and most important to challenge this dominant view is Colin Holmes, who, from the early 1970s onwards, provided a framework for a different interpretation based on extensive research. This challenge came not only through his own work but also that of a 'new school' of students who studied under him and the creation of the journal Immigrants and Minorities in 1982. This volume not only celebrates this remarkable achievement, but also explores the state of migrant historiography (including responses to migrants) in the twenty-first century.

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Published date: 25 July 2018

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Local EPrints ID: 427904
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427904
PURE UUID: 6b26efba-09fa-439a-80c8-7cc1b7d1fa7a

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Date deposited: 04 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 17:30

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Contributors

Editor: Jennifer Craig-Norton
Editor: Christhard Hoffmann
Editor: Tony Kushner

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