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Sex-specific moderation by lifestyle and psychosocial factors on the genetic contributions to adiposity: analyses of 112,151 individuals from the UK Biobank

Sex-specific moderation by lifestyle and psychosocial factors on the genetic contributions to adiposity: analyses of 112,151 individuals from the UK Biobank
Sex-specific moderation by lifestyle and psychosocial factors on the genetic contributions to adiposity: analyses of 112,151 individuals from the UK Biobank
Evidence suggests that lifestyle factors, e.g. physical activity, moderate the manifestation of genetic susceptibility to obesity. The present study uses UK Biobank data to investigate interaction between polygenic scores (PGS) for two obesity indicators, and lifestyle and psychosocial factors in the prediction of the two indicators, with attention to sex-specific effects. Analyses were of 112 151 participants (58 914 females; 40 to 73 years) whose genetic data passed quality control. Moderation effects were analysed in linear regression models predicting body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), including interaction terms for PGS and each exposure. Greater physical activity, more education, higher income, moderate vs low alcohol consumption, and low material deprivation were each associated with a relatively lower risk for manifestation of genetic susceptibility to obesity (p < 0.001); the moderating effects of physical activity and alcohol consumption were greater in women than men (three-way interaction: p = 0.009 and p = 0.008, respectively). More income and less neuroticism were related to reduced manifestation of genetic susceptibility to high WHR (p = 0.007; p = 0.003); the effect of income was greater in women (three-way interaction: p = 0.001). Lifestyle and psychosocial factors appear to offset genetic risk for adiposity in mid to late adulthood, with some sex-specific associations.
2045-2322
1-12
Calvin, Catherine M.
210b586c-ba86-4871-947d-82922461d6b0
Hagenaars, Saskia P.
f5bef8aa-aeef-44bf-be77-43a1dd2dac9d
Gallacher, John
a92ca535-75e3-488a-9890-255212b0328d
Harris, Sarah E.
925adc32-c478-44a2-84c0-1c7eefa8dfc8
Davies, Gail
1e979b2a-804f-4ba3-9c9b-519dd3a6b4be
Liewald, David C.
80c48af9-1d7d-40bf-8995-f2a39f93ce3c
Gale, Catharine
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Deary, Ian J.
027158ae-fbfb-40ea-98b1-32d2690499ac
Calvin, Catherine M.
210b586c-ba86-4871-947d-82922461d6b0
Hagenaars, Saskia P.
f5bef8aa-aeef-44bf-be77-43a1dd2dac9d
Gallacher, John
a92ca535-75e3-488a-9890-255212b0328d
Harris, Sarah E.
925adc32-c478-44a2-84c0-1c7eefa8dfc8
Davies, Gail
1e979b2a-804f-4ba3-9c9b-519dd3a6b4be
Liewald, David C.
80c48af9-1d7d-40bf-8995-f2a39f93ce3c
Gale, Catharine
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Deary, Ian J.
027158ae-fbfb-40ea-98b1-32d2690499ac

Calvin, Catherine M., Hagenaars, Saskia P., Gallacher, John, Harris, Sarah E., Davies, Gail, Liewald, David C., Gale, Catharine and Deary, Ian J. (2019) Sex-specific moderation by lifestyle and psychosocial factors on the genetic contributions to adiposity: analyses of 112,151 individuals from the UK Biobank. Scientific Reports, 9, 1-12. (doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36629-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Evidence suggests that lifestyle factors, e.g. physical activity, moderate the manifestation of genetic susceptibility to obesity. The present study uses UK Biobank data to investigate interaction between polygenic scores (PGS) for two obesity indicators, and lifestyle and psychosocial factors in the prediction of the two indicators, with attention to sex-specific effects. Analyses were of 112 151 participants (58 914 females; 40 to 73 years) whose genetic data passed quality control. Moderation effects were analysed in linear regression models predicting body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), including interaction terms for PGS and each exposure. Greater physical activity, more education, higher income, moderate vs low alcohol consumption, and low material deprivation were each associated with a relatively lower risk for manifestation of genetic susceptibility to obesity (p < 0.001); the moderating effects of physical activity and alcohol consumption were greater in women than men (three-way interaction: p = 0.009 and p = 0.008, respectively). More income and less neuroticism were related to reduced manifestation of genetic susceptibility to high WHR (p = 0.007; p = 0.003); the effect of income was greater in women (three-way interaction: p = 0.001). Lifestyle and psychosocial factors appear to offset genetic risk for adiposity in mid to late adulthood, with some sex-specific associations.

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Figure 1 - BMI forest plot
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Figure 2 - WHR forest plot
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Supplementary Information (Calvin) FINAL
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Accepted/In Press date: 14 November 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 23 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427920
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427920
ISSN: 2045-2322
PURE UUID: 04e4c437-05ba-40a6-92cd-e305956d6916
ORCID for Catharine Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3361-8638

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Date deposited: 04 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 12 Apr 2019 00:36

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Contributors

Author: Catherine M. Calvin
Author: Saskia P. Hagenaars
Author: John Gallacher
Author: Sarah E. Harris
Author: Gail Davies
Author: David C. Liewald
Author: Catharine Gale ORCID iD
Author: Ian J. Deary

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