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Effects of oblique shock waves on turbulent structures and statistics of supersonic mixing layers

Effects of oblique shock waves on turbulent structures and statistics of supersonic mixing layers
Effects of oblique shock waves on turbulent structures and statistics of supersonic mixing layers

A supersonic mixing layer at a convective Mach number of 0.8 was investigated by large eddy simulation. Turbulent structures and statistics of the mixing layer interacting with an oblique shock at different strengths in the self-preserving stage were investigated and compared with the shock-free mixing layer. An inflection point arises on the velocity profiles in the self-preserving region where the incident shock wave impinges, in addition to the three inflection points existing in the shock-free mixing layer. It is caused by the hairpin vortices induced through the baroclinic mechanism of the interaction of the incident shock wave. However, the induced hairpin vortices disappear quickly within a short distance. The vorticity thickness of the shocked-mixing layer experiences a sudden decrease in the vicinity of the shock impingement point, which is due to the induced hairpin vortices, followed by a more rapid growth than that of the shock-free mixing layer. So the incident shock has positive effects on the growth of the mixing layer. Both the hairpin vortices and the vortices originated from the hairpin vortices can result in a double-peak profile of the streamwise Reynolds stress in the transient stage of the mixing layer. In addition, the asymmetric profiles for the Reynolds stress are due to the hairpin vortices breakup earlier in the upper stream. The amplitudes of the Reynolds stress increase slightly and their peak positions move toward the center of the mixing layer even in the self-preserving stage. Moreover, the profiles of the transverse Reynolds stress and Reynolds shear stress have two peaks for the shocked-mixing layer which are caused by the reflected shock waves and the mixing layer. The incident shock increases energy transport and convection between the mixing layer and the mainstream. As a result, the mixing process of the shocked-mixing layer is enhanced.

1070-6631
1-18
Fang, Xinxin
00e2aa2c-6600-4a98-b317-dc08761fff12
Shen, Chibing
87536379-8880-41ca-ac38-6cf963294646
Sun, Mingbo
2df9eb75-e5d8-48cf-b8e1-00b0b77b3a90
Hu, Zhiwei
dd985844-1e6b-44ba-9e1d-fa57c6c88d65
Fang, Xinxin
00e2aa2c-6600-4a98-b317-dc08761fff12
Shen, Chibing
87536379-8880-41ca-ac38-6cf963294646
Sun, Mingbo
2df9eb75-e5d8-48cf-b8e1-00b0b77b3a90
Hu, Zhiwei
dd985844-1e6b-44ba-9e1d-fa57c6c88d65

Fang, Xinxin, Shen, Chibing, Sun, Mingbo and Hu, Zhiwei (2018) Effects of oblique shock waves on turbulent structures and statistics of supersonic mixing layers. Physics of Fluids, 30 (11), 1-18, [116101]. (doi:10.1063/1.5051015).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A supersonic mixing layer at a convective Mach number of 0.8 was investigated by large eddy simulation. Turbulent structures and statistics of the mixing layer interacting with an oblique shock at different strengths in the self-preserving stage were investigated and compared with the shock-free mixing layer. An inflection point arises on the velocity profiles in the self-preserving region where the incident shock wave impinges, in addition to the three inflection points existing in the shock-free mixing layer. It is caused by the hairpin vortices induced through the baroclinic mechanism of the interaction of the incident shock wave. However, the induced hairpin vortices disappear quickly within a short distance. The vorticity thickness of the shocked-mixing layer experiences a sudden decrease in the vicinity of the shock impingement point, which is due to the induced hairpin vortices, followed by a more rapid growth than that of the shock-free mixing layer. So the incident shock has positive effects on the growth of the mixing layer. Both the hairpin vortices and the vortices originated from the hairpin vortices can result in a double-peak profile of the streamwise Reynolds stress in the transient stage of the mixing layer. In addition, the asymmetric profiles for the Reynolds stress are due to the hairpin vortices breakup earlier in the upper stream. The amplitudes of the Reynolds stress increase slightly and their peak positions move toward the center of the mixing layer even in the self-preserving stage. Moreover, the profiles of the transverse Reynolds stress and Reynolds shear stress have two peaks for the shocked-mixing layer which are caused by the reflected shock waves and the mixing layer. The incident shock increases energy transport and convection between the mixing layer and the mainstream. As a result, the mixing process of the shocked-mixing layer is enhanced.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 November 2018
Published date: November 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428142
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428142
ISSN: 1070-6631
PURE UUID: 8031bc08-24f0-4609-9a86-3d44d27b2e80

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Date deposited: 12 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 00:43

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