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Weighted point-to-point repetitive control for drop-foot assistance

Weighted point-to-point repetitive control for drop-foot assistance
Weighted point-to-point repetitive control for drop-foot assistance
Drop-foot is a neurological condition caused by nerve damage or as a result of a brain/spinal injury. The condition leads to a abnormal, slow, tiring gait with an increased probability of falls. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has had considerable success in treating drop-foot, but commercial approaches lack closed loop control which degrades there performance. Currently closed loop controllers available in the research domain require significant sensory data or have limited accuracy, making them unsuitable for implementation. This paper is the first application of repetitive control (RC) to this problem. To overcome data requirements whilst maintaining accuracy of key gait events, a comprehensive point to point framework is derived. Further to this, a weighted modification is proposed allowing prioritisation of points. Simulation results for the ’weighted point-to-point’ and ’point-to-point’ RC frameworks for FES assisted drop-foot confirm their improved convergence and robust performance properties.
468-473
IEEE
Page, A. P.
0c80d0ed-7cce-4346-8e85-8d63377ee58b
Freeman, C. T.
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Chu, B.
555a86a5-0198-4242-8525-3492349d4f0f
Page, A. P.
0c80d0ed-7cce-4346-8e85-8d63377ee58b
Freeman, C. T.
ccdd1272-cdc7-43fb-a1bb-b1ef0bdf5815
Chu, B.
555a86a5-0198-4242-8525-3492349d4f0f

Page, A. P., Freeman, C. T. and Chu, B. (2018) Weighted point-to-point repetitive control for drop-foot assistance. In 018 UKACC 12th International Conference on Control (CONTROL). IEEE. pp. 468-473 . (doi:10.1109/CONTROL.2018.8516840).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Drop-foot is a neurological condition caused by nerve damage or as a result of a brain/spinal injury. The condition leads to a abnormal, slow, tiring gait with an increased probability of falls. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) has had considerable success in treating drop-foot, but commercial approaches lack closed loop control which degrades there performance. Currently closed loop controllers available in the research domain require significant sensory data or have limited accuracy, making them unsuitable for implementation. This paper is the first application of repetitive control (RC) to this problem. To overcome data requirements whilst maintaining accuracy of key gait events, a comprehensive point to point framework is derived. Further to this, a weighted modification is proposed allowing prioritisation of points. Simulation results for the ’weighted point-to-point’ and ’point-to-point’ RC frameworks for FES assisted drop-foot confirm their improved convergence and robust performance properties.

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More information

Published date: 7 September 2018
Venue - Dates: UKACC 12th International Conference on Control, CONTROL 2018, United Kingdom, 2018-09-04 - 2018-09-06

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428215
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428215
PURE UUID: 28bb9b2f-b6ca-4fba-9d03-b8d9ada8abe7
ORCID for B. Chu: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2711-8717

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 30 Jan 2020 01:38

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Contributors

Author: A. P. Page
Author: C. T. Freeman
Author: B. Chu ORCID iD

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