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The warped sea of sailing: Maritime topographies of space and time for the Bronze Age eastern Mediterranean

The warped sea of sailing: Maritime topographies of space and time for the Bronze Age eastern Mediterranean
The warped sea of sailing: Maritime topographies of space and time for the Bronze Age eastern Mediterranean
Time has consistently been regarded as the missing dimension from our renderings of space, having a significant impact on how we interpret and represent past interaction. Nowhere is this more keenly felt than in discussion of maritime mobility. This paper outlines an innovative approach to mapping maritime spaces by taking into account the performance of Bronze Age sailing ships in different weather conditions and the subsequent time of sailing journeys. The use of cartograms is demonstrated to be invaluable for reconceptualisation of maritime space and rethinking maritime connectivity in the past. This marks a step-change in approach, which has implications for regions beyond the case study area (eastern Mediterranean).

The results presented in this paper foreground meaningful differences in maritime connectivity between Egypt and the Levant during the earlier Bronze Age than are easily realised through traditional static representations. This demonstrates the significance of developing alternative representations of space/time for archaeology.
Cartogram, GIS, Maritime networks, Mediterranean, Space-time
0305-4403
1-15
El Safadi, Crystal
262bdcd0-1f88-41b9-915f-819dec8143dd
Sturt, Fraser
442e14e1-136f-4159-bd8e-b002bf6b95f6
El Safadi, Crystal
262bdcd0-1f88-41b9-915f-819dec8143dd
Sturt, Fraser
442e14e1-136f-4159-bd8e-b002bf6b95f6

El Safadi, Crystal and Sturt, Fraser (2019) The warped sea of sailing: Maritime topographies of space and time for the Bronze Age eastern Mediterranean. Journal of Archaeological Science, 103, 1-15. (doi:10.1016/j.jas.2019.01.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Time has consistently been regarded as the missing dimension from our renderings of space, having a significant impact on how we interpret and represent past interaction. Nowhere is this more keenly felt than in discussion of maritime mobility. This paper outlines an innovative approach to mapping maritime spaces by taking into account the performance of Bronze Age sailing ships in different weather conditions and the subsequent time of sailing journeys. The use of cartograms is demonstrated to be invaluable for reconceptualisation of maritime space and rethinking maritime connectivity in the past. This marks a step-change in approach, which has implications for regions beyond the case study area (eastern Mediterranean).

The results presented in this paper foreground meaningful differences in maritime connectivity between Egypt and the Levant during the earlier Bronze Age than are easily realised through traditional static representations. This demonstrates the significance of developing alternative representations of space/time for archaeology.

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Cs_FS_Warped Sea - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 January 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 January 2019
Published date: March 2019
Keywords: Cartogram, GIS, Maritime networks, Mediterranean, Space-time

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428246
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428246
ISSN: 0305-4403
PURE UUID: 19d6fa9c-c25c-4302-bb92-f6b521154a29

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 17:35

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