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Immunometabolic links between estrogen, adipose tissue and female reproductive metabolism

Immunometabolic links between estrogen, adipose tissue and female reproductive metabolism
Immunometabolic links between estrogen, adipose tissue and female reproductive metabolism
The current knowledge of sex-dependent differences in adipose tissue biology remains in its infancy and is motivated in part by the desire to understand why menopause is linked to an increased risk of metabolic disease. However, the development and characterization of targeted genetically-modified rodent models are shedding new light on the physiological actions of sex hormones in healthy reproductive metabolism. In this review we consider the need for differentially regulating metabolic flexibility, energy balance, and immunity in a sex-dependent manner. We discuss the recent advances in our understanding of physiological roles of systemic estrogen in regulating sex-dependent adipose tissue distribution, form and function; and in sex-dependent healthy immune function. We also review the decline in protective properties of estrogen signaling in pathophysiological settings such as obesity-related metaflammation and metabolic disease. It is clear that the many physiological actions of estrogen on energy balance, immunity, and immunometabolism together with its dynamic regulation in females make it an excellent candidate for regulating metabolic flexibility in the context of reproductive metabolism.
2079-7737
Eaton, Sally A.
ee3ff9d6-cf9d-4ee3-be1e-9e6b2cd133c0
Sethi, Jaswinder K.
923f1a81-91e4-46cd-8853-bb4a979f5a85
Eaton, Sally A.
ee3ff9d6-cf9d-4ee3-be1e-9e6b2cd133c0
Sethi, Jaswinder K.
923f1a81-91e4-46cd-8853-bb4a979f5a85

Eaton, Sally A. and Sethi, Jaswinder K. (2019) Immunometabolic links between estrogen, adipose tissue and female reproductive metabolism. Biology, 8 (1). (doi:10.3390/biology8010008).

Record type: Review

Abstract

The current knowledge of sex-dependent differences in adipose tissue biology remains in its infancy and is motivated in part by the desire to understand why menopause is linked to an increased risk of metabolic disease. However, the development and characterization of targeted genetically-modified rodent models are shedding new light on the physiological actions of sex hormones in healthy reproductive metabolism. In this review we consider the need for differentially regulating metabolic flexibility, energy balance, and immunity in a sex-dependent manner. We discuss the recent advances in our understanding of physiological roles of systemic estrogen in regulating sex-dependent adipose tissue distribution, form and function; and in sex-dependent healthy immune function. We also review the decline in protective properties of estrogen signaling in pathophysiological settings such as obesity-related metaflammation and metabolic disease. It is clear that the many physiological actions of estrogen on energy balance, immunity, and immunometabolism together with its dynamic regulation in females make it an excellent candidate for regulating metabolic flexibility in the context of reproductive metabolism.

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biology-08-00008-v2 - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 3 February 2019
Published date: 7 February 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428261
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428261
ISSN: 2079-7737
PURE UUID: b237c9b1-4de1-418f-b2ec-a2a16493ca9d
ORCID for Jaswinder K. Sethi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4157-0475

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 16:42

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