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Neurodiversity awareness: Is Malaysia there yet?

Neurodiversity awareness: Is Malaysia there yet?
Neurodiversity awareness: Is Malaysia there yet?
Scientific research on dyslexia has taken place for the past 50 years some tensions between education and cognitive neuroscience researchers. Clinical research on dyslexia via fMRI has finally revealed that the dyslexic brain works differently. The findings have brought in new synergy between research in education and cognitive neuroscience supporting the neurodiversity movement. There is a connection between the constructs of neurodiversity, specific learning difficulties and the more focused studies of dyslexia. This qualitative study was conducted to understand the Malaysian mainstream primary school teachers’ beliefs about SpLD and the current framework for Malaysian literacy support programme. The data was collected via social media focus group discussion and individual instant messaging interviews from forty-one teachers regarding their views and experiences in literacy programme. The analysis was deductive based on a framework of teachers’ knowledge, skills and understanding of dyslexia. The findings revealed that the current programme is built on theories of remediation, that the teachers have exhibited good levels of understanding of remediation, but not yet understand neurodiversity.
neurodiversity , Inclusion, spld
Binti A.Rahman, Aida
ed4792fb-7f6b-47ca-96f3-631659e6266b
Woollard, John
85f363e3-9708-4740-acf7-3fe0d1845001
Binti A.Rahman, Aida
ed4792fb-7f6b-47ca-96f3-631659e6266b
Woollard, John
85f363e3-9708-4740-acf7-3fe0d1845001

Binti A.Rahman, Aida and Woollard, John (2018) Neurodiversity awareness: Is Malaysia there yet? 3rd Technical and Vocational Education & Training International Conference, Johur, Malaysia. 26 - 27 Nov 2018. 12 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Scientific research on dyslexia has taken place for the past 50 years some tensions between education and cognitive neuroscience researchers. Clinical research on dyslexia via fMRI has finally revealed that the dyslexic brain works differently. The findings have brought in new synergy between research in education and cognitive neuroscience supporting the neurodiversity movement. There is a connection between the constructs of neurodiversity, specific learning difficulties and the more focused studies of dyslexia. This qualitative study was conducted to understand the Malaysian mainstream primary school teachers’ beliefs about SpLD and the current framework for Malaysian literacy support programme. The data was collected via social media focus group discussion and individual instant messaging interviews from forty-one teachers regarding their views and experiences in literacy programme. The analysis was deductive based on a framework of teachers’ knowledge, skills and understanding of dyslexia. The findings revealed that the current programme is built on theories of remediation, that the teachers have exhibited good levels of understanding of remediation, but not yet understand neurodiversity.

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More information

Published date: 26 November 2018
Venue - Dates: 3rd Technical and Vocational Education & Training International Conference, Johur, Malaysia, 2018-11-26 - 2018-11-27
Keywords: neurodiversity , Inclusion, spld

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428287
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428287
PURE UUID: 5b57c1f3-5f79-4b9e-aac4-ac699a13dd2e

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 27 Mar 2019 17:30

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