The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Early Ipswichian (last interglacial) sea level rise in the channel region: Stone Point Site of Special Scientific Interest, Hampshire, England

Early Ipswichian (last interglacial) sea level rise in the channel region: Stone Point Site of Special Scientific Interest, Hampshire, England
Early Ipswichian (last interglacial) sea level rise in the channel region: Stone Point Site of Special Scientific Interest, Hampshire, England

Constraining the speed of sea level rise at the start of an interglacial is important to understanding the size of the ‘window of opportunity’ available for hominin migration. This is particularly important during the last interglacial when there is no evidence for significant hominin occupation anywhere in Britain. There are very few finer grained fossiliferous sequences in the Channel region that can be used to constrain sea level rise and they are preserved only to the north of the Channel, in England. Of these, the sequence at Stone Point SSSI is by far the most complete. Data from this sequence has been previously reported, and discussed at a Quaternary Research Association Field Meeting, where a number of further questions were raised that necessitated further data generation. In this paper, we report new data from this sequence – thin section analysis, isotopic determinations on ostracod shells, new Optical Stimulated Luminescence ages and Amino Acid Recem analyses. These show early sea level rise in this sequence, starting during the pre-temperate vegetation zone IpI, but no early warming. The implications of this almost certainly last interglacial sequence for the human colonisation of Britain and our understanding of the stratigraphic relationship of interglacial estuarine deposits with their related fluvial terrace sequences is explored.

AAR, Estuary, Interglacial sequence, OSL, Sea level
0016-7878
1-26
Briant, Rebecca M.
6e2a1545-425f-4340-bbe9-42e0ad70c79d
Bates, Martin R.
f10599cd-fc06-4adb-864e-7c5bb0e9bcb7
Boreham, Steve
138c53e2-734a-4b73-af8a-ccc3524ba94c
Cameron, Nigel G.
a0f67074-865d-4ae0-95a2-d7311760632b
Coope, G. Russell
3d0c6d6a-f625-4bb2-870e-7481505c6b46
Field, Michael H.
f2fc3951-2cce-467c-bced-717bdb59565f
Hatch, B. Marcus
a9216bea-aff6-4753-b6e9-ac6c53cd1fc0
Holmes, Jonathan A.
d45c43cd-b315-4dc6-8aba-7ecbe809e31b
Keen, David H.
942e062d-5053-4c67-8c26-dda420ce9637
Kilfeather, Aiobhean A.
5a7e7837-8910-437f-9515-87a9893853ca
Penkman, Kirsty E.H.
f94c1369-265e-4ddb-8578-80d6d6cdc616
Simons, Rianne M.J.
cdc6df84-0c65-4de9-be4f-d9882116927c
Schwenninger, Jean Luc
e5bd3170-c1e9-4be5-99ce-1342a3bda7dc
Wenban-Smith, Francis F.
d2cdf06f-ff1d-41f7-a57c-a9c8e25a2110
Whitehouse, Nicola J.
9c5e770d-a5c1-46c1-b0d1-b079244d828d
Whittaker, John E.
9bcd8d62-8c95-4823-9de5-f781afa7a0ed
Briant, Rebecca M.
6e2a1545-425f-4340-bbe9-42e0ad70c79d
Bates, Martin R.
f10599cd-fc06-4adb-864e-7c5bb0e9bcb7
Boreham, Steve
138c53e2-734a-4b73-af8a-ccc3524ba94c
Cameron, Nigel G.
a0f67074-865d-4ae0-95a2-d7311760632b
Coope, G. Russell
3d0c6d6a-f625-4bb2-870e-7481505c6b46
Field, Michael H.
f2fc3951-2cce-467c-bced-717bdb59565f
Hatch, B. Marcus
a9216bea-aff6-4753-b6e9-ac6c53cd1fc0
Holmes, Jonathan A.
d45c43cd-b315-4dc6-8aba-7ecbe809e31b
Keen, David H.
942e062d-5053-4c67-8c26-dda420ce9637
Kilfeather, Aiobhean A.
5a7e7837-8910-437f-9515-87a9893853ca
Penkman, Kirsty E.H.
f94c1369-265e-4ddb-8578-80d6d6cdc616
Simons, Rianne M.J.
cdc6df84-0c65-4de9-be4f-d9882116927c
Schwenninger, Jean Luc
e5bd3170-c1e9-4be5-99ce-1342a3bda7dc
Wenban-Smith, Francis F.
d2cdf06f-ff1d-41f7-a57c-a9c8e25a2110
Whitehouse, Nicola J.
9c5e770d-a5c1-46c1-b0d1-b079244d828d
Whittaker, John E.
9bcd8d62-8c95-4823-9de5-f781afa7a0ed

Briant, Rebecca M., Bates, Martin R., Boreham, Steve, Cameron, Nigel G., Coope, G. Russell, Field, Michael H., Hatch, B. Marcus, Holmes, Jonathan A., Keen, David H., Kilfeather, Aiobhean A., Penkman, Kirsty E.H., Simons, Rianne M.J., Schwenninger, Jean Luc, Wenban-Smith, Francis F., Whitehouse, Nicola J. and Whittaker, John E. (2019) Early Ipswichian (last interglacial) sea level rise in the channel region: Stone Point Site of Special Scientific Interest, Hampshire, England. Proceedings of the Geologists' Association, 130 (1), 1-26. (doi:10.1016/j.pgeola.2018.03.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Constraining the speed of sea level rise at the start of an interglacial is important to understanding the size of the ‘window of opportunity’ available for hominin migration. This is particularly important during the last interglacial when there is no evidence for significant hominin occupation anywhere in Britain. There are very few finer grained fossiliferous sequences in the Channel region that can be used to constrain sea level rise and they are preserved only to the north of the Channel, in England. Of these, the sequence at Stone Point SSSI is by far the most complete. Data from this sequence has been previously reported, and discussed at a Quaternary Research Association Field Meeting, where a number of further questions were raised that necessitated further data generation. In this paper, we report new data from this sequence – thin section analysis, isotopic determinations on ostracod shells, new Optical Stimulated Luminescence ages and Amino Acid Recem analyses. These show early sea level rise in this sequence, starting during the pre-temperate vegetation zone IpI, but no early warming. The implications of this almost certainly last interglacial sequence for the human colonisation of Britain and our understanding of the stratigraphic relationship of interglacial estuarine deposits with their related fluvial terrace sequences is explored.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 November 2018
Published date: 1 February 2019
Keywords: AAR, Estuary, Interglacial sequence, OSL, Sea level

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428322
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428322
ISSN: 0016-7878
PURE UUID: 7f3759f7-5394-4758-a7f9-98d06509f12d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 00:52

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Rebecca M. Briant
Author: Martin R. Bates
Author: Steve Boreham
Author: Nigel G. Cameron
Author: G. Russell Coope
Author: Michael H. Field
Author: B. Marcus Hatch
Author: Jonathan A. Holmes
Author: David H. Keen
Author: Aiobhean A. Kilfeather
Author: Kirsty E.H. Penkman
Author: Rianne M.J. Simons
Author: Jean Luc Schwenninger
Author: Nicola J. Whitehouse
Author: John E. Whittaker

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×