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Performance analysis of a heaving wing using DNS and LES

Performance analysis of a heaving wing using DNS and LES
Performance analysis of a heaving wing using DNS and LES

The weight and structure of civil transport aircraft are mainly dictated by the loads they experience at the limit of the design envelope (e.g. turbulence, gusts and manoeuvres). During the design process aircraft loading is often predicted using simplified models. However, under extreme operating conditions aircraft experience erratic unsteady loads that are not well understood, and hence difficult to predict using state of the art reduced models. Achieving a more profound understanding of the flow structures dictating the aerodynamic loads under extreme conditions will be crucial for the design of efficient aircraft. An example of such conditions occurs when a wing starts heaving or encounters a gust near its stall angle (e.g. during landing); unsteady flows and transient effects, including flow instabilities and vortex shedding, take place, making the aerodynamic loads highly unpredictable (see for example Von Ellenrieder et al, J Fluid Mech, 490:129–138, 2003, [1]). These complex physical mechanisms can only be fully captured by experiments and accurate numerical simulations, both of which are currently expensive to be used during the design stages, but can provide useful insight. Direct numerical simulations (DNS), being free from simplified modelling assumptions, have the advantage of including all the relevant flow physics. On the other hand, the large eddy simulation (LES) technique can be used to simulate realistic flow conditions, but its accuracy in predicting complex flow phenomena including flow instability and vortex shedding is not clear. This work focuses on assessing the performance of OpenFoam’s LES solver for the prediction of the aerodynamic loads acting on a heaving wing at incidence through comparisons with DNS and experimental results.

1382-4309
397-403
Springer
De Tullio, N.
db4397b2-3fab-476c-a0f4-4caf9848d5f7
Xie, Z.
98ced75d-5617-4c2d-b20f-7038c54f4ff0
Chalke, J.
cb0e32ab-d046-4aa9-a51b-8e21cc41fe82
Sandham, N.D.
0024d8cd-c788-4811-a470-57934fbdcf97
Salvetti, M.
Armenio, V.
Fröhlich, J.
Geurts, B.
Kuerten, H.
De Tullio, N.
db4397b2-3fab-476c-a0f4-4caf9848d5f7
Xie, Z.
98ced75d-5617-4c2d-b20f-7038c54f4ff0
Chalke, J.
cb0e32ab-d046-4aa9-a51b-8e21cc41fe82
Sandham, N.D.
0024d8cd-c788-4811-a470-57934fbdcf97
Salvetti, M.
Armenio, V.
Fröhlich, J.
Geurts, B.
Kuerten, H.

De Tullio, N., Xie, Z., Chalke, J. and Sandham, N.D. (2019) Performance analysis of a heaving wing using DNS and LES. In, Salvetti, M., Armenio, V., Fröhlich, J., Geurts, B. and Kuerten, H. (eds.) Direct and Large-Eddy Simulation XI. (ERCOFTAC Series, , (doi:10.1007/978-3-030-04915-7_52), 25) Cham. Springer, pp. 397-403. (doi:10.1007/978-3-030-04915-7_52).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The weight and structure of civil transport aircraft are mainly dictated by the loads they experience at the limit of the design envelope (e.g. turbulence, gusts and manoeuvres). During the design process aircraft loading is often predicted using simplified models. However, under extreme operating conditions aircraft experience erratic unsteady loads that are not well understood, and hence difficult to predict using state of the art reduced models. Achieving a more profound understanding of the flow structures dictating the aerodynamic loads under extreme conditions will be crucial for the design of efficient aircraft. An example of such conditions occurs when a wing starts heaving or encounters a gust near its stall angle (e.g. during landing); unsteady flows and transient effects, including flow instabilities and vortex shedding, take place, making the aerodynamic loads highly unpredictable (see for example Von Ellenrieder et al, J Fluid Mech, 490:129–138, 2003, [1]). These complex physical mechanisms can only be fully captured by experiments and accurate numerical simulations, both of which are currently expensive to be used during the design stages, but can provide useful insight. Direct numerical simulations (DNS), being free from simplified modelling assumptions, have the advantage of including all the relevant flow physics. On the other hand, the large eddy simulation (LES) technique can be used to simulate realistic flow conditions, but its accuracy in predicting complex flow phenomena including flow instability and vortex shedding is not clear. This work focuses on assessing the performance of OpenFoam’s LES solver for the prediction of the aerodynamic loads acting on a heaving wing at incidence through comparisons with DNS and experimental results.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 2 February 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428363
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428363
ISSN: 1382-4309
PURE UUID: 0f7d767a-ce57-4764-9e5d-80f58e7178b8
ORCID for Z. Xie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8119-7532
ORCID for N.D. Sandham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5107-0944

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:10

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