The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

The impact of a GP-led community paediatric allergy clinic: A service evaluation

The impact of a GP-led community paediatric allergy clinic: A service evaluation
The impact of a GP-led community paediatric allergy clinic: A service evaluation
Background: The NHS is not meeting the nation’s allergy needs. There are insufficient allergy specialists, with variable care across the country. General Practitioners (GPs) are lacking in allergy training. London’s Whittington Hospital created a GP with Special Interest (GPwSI) community paediatric allergy clinic, running alongside pre-existing hospital clinics, to address local unmet needs, aiming to provide equity for patients, improve patient experience and decrease secondary care burden. Objectives: To establish whether improvements have occurred within the service by introducing a GPwSI-led community paediatric allergy clinic alongside providing GP education and referral pathways. This study asks: 1: Have allergy-related hospital attendances decreased with the provision of the community service? 2: Are patients seen in the appropriate clinic? 3: What proportion of patients require GPwSI follow-up? 4: Is there good patient satisfaction? 5: Have allergy clinic waiting times changed? Methods: Numbers of allergy-related hospital attendances and waiting times in 2013, 2014 and 2016 were assessed. Data was analysed regarding proportions of patients requiring GPwSI follow-up or referral from the GPwSI community clinic to hospital. Patient satisfaction was assessed. Results: Since introducing the GPwSI community service the burden on secondary care has decreased, with reduced hospital attendances for allergy clinic patients, although waiting times have increased. In 2013, 65% of allergy clinic patients attended other hospital services for allergy-related complaints prior to their first allergy clinic appointment. This was reduced to 27.3% (community) and 36.9% (hospital) in 2014 and maintained in 2016 (27.5% community and 37.5% hospital), p<0.01. Patient satisfaction in the hospital and community clinics is very high. Clinical Relevance: This integrated, multidisciplinary paediatric allergy service could provide a model to improve the unmet allergy need both in the UK and beyond. This GPwSI model could also be applied to other chronic diseases in both adults and children, improving care beyond allergy.
0954-7894
El-Shanawany, Isobel R.
a5974ca9-4670-4ab0-ae6c-f5eeb6a80525
Wade, C.
d9fa81c0-8625-4627-af37-5234a7b528fb
Holloway, Judith
f22f45f3-6fc8-4a4c-bc6c-24add507037c
El-Shanawany, Isobel R.
a5974ca9-4670-4ab0-ae6c-f5eeb6a80525
Wade, C.
d9fa81c0-8625-4627-af37-5234a7b528fb
Holloway, Judith
f22f45f3-6fc8-4a4c-bc6c-24add507037c

El-Shanawany, Isobel R., Wade, C. and Holloway, Judith (2019) The impact of a GP-led community paediatric allergy clinic: A service evaluation. Clinical and Experimental Allergy. (doi:10.1111/cea.13375).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The NHS is not meeting the nation’s allergy needs. There are insufficient allergy specialists, with variable care across the country. General Practitioners (GPs) are lacking in allergy training. London’s Whittington Hospital created a GP with Special Interest (GPwSI) community paediatric allergy clinic, running alongside pre-existing hospital clinics, to address local unmet needs, aiming to provide equity for patients, improve patient experience and decrease secondary care burden. Objectives: To establish whether improvements have occurred within the service by introducing a GPwSI-led community paediatric allergy clinic alongside providing GP education and referral pathways. This study asks: 1: Have allergy-related hospital attendances decreased with the provision of the community service? 2: Are patients seen in the appropriate clinic? 3: What proportion of patients require GPwSI follow-up? 4: Is there good patient satisfaction? 5: Have allergy clinic waiting times changed? Methods: Numbers of allergy-related hospital attendances and waiting times in 2013, 2014 and 2016 were assessed. Data was analysed regarding proportions of patients requiring GPwSI follow-up or referral from the GPwSI community clinic to hospital. Patient satisfaction was assessed. Results: Since introducing the GPwSI community service the burden on secondary care has decreased, with reduced hospital attendances for allergy clinic patients, although waiting times have increased. In 2013, 65% of allergy clinic patients attended other hospital services for allergy-related complaints prior to their first allergy clinic appointment. This was reduced to 27.3% (community) and 36.9% (hospital) in 2014 and maintained in 2016 (27.5% community and 37.5% hospital), p<0.01. Patient satisfaction in the hospital and community clinics is very high. Clinical Relevance: This integrated, multidisciplinary paediatric allergy service could provide a model to improve the unmet allergy need both in the UK and beyond. This GPwSI model could also be applied to other chronic diseases in both adults and children, improving care beyond allergy.

Text
El-Shanawany et a. 2019 CEA - Accepted Manuscript
Download (576kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 11 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 February 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428476
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428476
ISSN: 0954-7894
PURE UUID: e04becc1-27a7-4712-875b-3b71a5e57c85
ORCID for Judith Holloway: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2268-3071

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 28 Feb 2019 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:28

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Isobel R. El-Shanawany
Author: C. Wade
Author: Judith Holloway ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×