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Proving what is thought: The efficacy of MCQs

Proving what is thought: The efficacy of MCQs
Proving what is thought: The efficacy of MCQs
Multiple choice questions (MCQs) have enjoyed a renaissance. Online technology has enabled easy and personalised delivery; immediate feedback to users in response to their answers; large, crowd sources banks of questions; and adaptive selection of questions based on prior performance. This presentation considers how good MCQs can be identified. Good can be very subjective but based upon a clear understanding of the content knowledge and the pedagogic issues associated with question construction. The description of good is extended to how well the question behaves when answered by a large number of users. Item response theory (IRT) is a paradigm for the analysis and scoring of test instruments using the relationship between a person’s performance on a test item and the person’s overall performance level described in terms of probability. Finally, the full study, which identifies the relationship between computational thinking ability, responses to a self perception questionnaire and comparison with secondary data related to overall ability. The conclusions include: the computational thinking MCQs show a high degree of reliability; algebra and general school achievement and students’ perception are significant predictors of computational thinking performance; and there is no gender difference noted in computational thinking performance and perceptions of computational thinking.
item response theory, computational thinking, assessment
Mindetbay, Yerkhan, Amankeldiuly
eca2153f-93ad-4ccd-9e46-7e6e9dcd6457
Woollard, John
85f363e3-9708-4740-acf7-3fe0d1845001
Mindetbay, Yerkhan, Amankeldiuly
eca2153f-93ad-4ccd-9e46-7e6e9dcd6457
Woollard, John
85f363e3-9708-4740-acf7-3fe0d1845001

Mindetbay, Yerkhan, Amankeldiuly and Woollard, John (2019) Proving what is thought: The efficacy of MCQs. CAS Research Meeting, Cambridge, United Kingdom. 22 Feb 2019.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Multiple choice questions (MCQs) have enjoyed a renaissance. Online technology has enabled easy and personalised delivery; immediate feedback to users in response to their answers; large, crowd sources banks of questions; and adaptive selection of questions based on prior performance. This presentation considers how good MCQs can be identified. Good can be very subjective but based upon a clear understanding of the content knowledge and the pedagogic issues associated with question construction. The description of good is extended to how well the question behaves when answered by a large number of users. Item response theory (IRT) is a paradigm for the analysis and scoring of test instruments using the relationship between a person’s performance on a test item and the person’s overall performance level described in terms of probability. Finally, the full study, which identifies the relationship between computational thinking ability, responses to a self perception questionnaire and comparison with secondary data related to overall ability. The conclusions include: the computational thinking MCQs show a high degree of reliability; algebra and general school achievement and students’ perception are significant predictors of computational thinking performance; and there is no gender difference noted in computational thinking performance and perceptions of computational thinking.

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EfficacyofMCQs - Author's Original
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Published date: 22 February 2019
Additional Information: Mindetbay, Y., & Woollard, J. (2019) Proving what is thought: The efficacy of MCQs.
Venue - Dates: CAS Research Meeting, Cambridge, United Kingdom, 2019-02-22 - 2019-02-22
Keywords: item response theory, computational thinking, assessment

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Local EPrints ID: 428522
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428522
PURE UUID: a3282594-86b4-4e4b-bbe4-0e474b533900

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Date deposited: 01 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 17:32

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