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The influence of number of syllables on word skipping during reading revisited

The influence of number of syllables on word skipping during reading revisited
The influence of number of syllables on word skipping during reading revisited
Fitzsimmons and Drieghe (2011, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review) showed that a monosyllabic word was skipped more often than a disyllabic word during reading. This finding was interpreted as evidence that syllabic information was extracted from the parafovea early enough to influence word skipping. In the present large-scale replication of this study in which we additionally measured the reading, vocabulary, and spelling abilities of the participants, the effect of number of syllables on word skipping was not significant. Moreover, a Bayesian analysis indicated strong evidence for the absence of the effect. The individual differences analyses replicate previous observations showing that spelling ability uniquely predicts word skipping (but not fixation times) because better spellers skip more often. The results indicate that high quality lexical representations allow the system to reach an advanced stage in the word recognition process of the parafoveal word early enough to influence the decision whether or not to skip the word but this decision is not influenced by number of syllables.
1069-9384
616-621
Drieghe, Denis
dfe41922-1cea-47f4-904b-26d5c9fe85ce
Veldre, Aaron
09d74fd9-0dec-4163-9e78-def7e8b5646a
Fitzsimmons, Gemma
ac6b7c69-8992-44f1-92ca-05aa22e75129
Ashby, Jane
9d782943-e317-4b63-9d92-0c605e649b15
Andrews, Sally
024fe542-558e-4958-b7e4-305d15757c7e
Drieghe, Denis
dfe41922-1cea-47f4-904b-26d5c9fe85ce
Veldre, Aaron
09d74fd9-0dec-4163-9e78-def7e8b5646a
Fitzsimmons, Gemma
ac6b7c69-8992-44f1-92ca-05aa22e75129
Ashby, Jane
9d782943-e317-4b63-9d92-0c605e649b15
Andrews, Sally
024fe542-558e-4958-b7e4-305d15757c7e

Drieghe, Denis, Veldre, Aaron, Fitzsimmons, Gemma, Ashby, Jane and Andrews, Sally (2019) The influence of number of syllables on word skipping during reading revisited. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 26, 616-621. (doi:10.3758/s13423-019-01590-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Fitzsimmons and Drieghe (2011, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review) showed that a monosyllabic word was skipped more often than a disyllabic word during reading. This finding was interpreted as evidence that syllabic information was extracted from the parafovea early enough to influence word skipping. In the present large-scale replication of this study in which we additionally measured the reading, vocabulary, and spelling abilities of the participants, the effect of number of syllables on word skipping was not significant. Moreover, a Bayesian analysis indicated strong evidence for the absence of the effect. The individual differences analyses replicate previous observations showing that spelling ability uniquely predicts word skipping (but not fixation times) because better spellers skip more often. The results indicate that high quality lexical representations allow the system to reach an advanced stage in the word recognition process of the parafoveal word early enough to influence the decision whether or not to skip the word but this decision is not influenced by number of syllables.

Text
Drieghe, Veldre, Fitzsimmons, Ashby & Andrews (revision submitted) - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 15 March 2020.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 March 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 March 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428627
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428627
ISSN: 1069-9384
PURE UUID: 3b6e2c20-4a6b-43c3-a7f6-face9baa7bd8
ORCID for Gemma Fitzsimmons: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4519-0499

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Date deposited: 05 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 24 May 2019 00:44

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