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Functional sit-to-stands evoke greater neuromuscular activation than orthopaedic bed exercises in healthy older adults

Functional sit-to-stands evoke greater neuromuscular activation than orthopaedic bed exercises in healthy older adults
Functional sit-to-stands evoke greater neuromuscular activation than orthopaedic bed exercises in healthy older adults
Objective: to compare EMG activity of the hip and thigh muscles during traditional static bed exercises and the sit-to-stand exercise in healthy older adults.

Methods: twenty-four healthy, older adults (8 males; age 65 ± 7 y) performed four static rehabilitation exercises: isometric contractions of the gluteal, abductor, inner quadriceps and quadriceps (ten, ∼ 5 s submaximal contractions, with 60 rests), and the sit-to-stand test. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, gluteus medius, biceps femoris and gluteus maximus, and root mean square-processed (RMS) in this observational preliminary study. Handgrip strength and 10 m walking speed represented participant characteristics.

Results: hip and thigh muscles were activated differently between the isometric bed and sit-to-stand exercises. Greatest RMS activity was shown in the chair rising phase of the sit-to-stand exercise. No bed exercise exceeded the muscle RMS activity required to perform a sit-to-stand, and only for sit-to-stands were all muscles activated over 40% of maximal; the level required to stimulate muscle strength adaptation.

Conclusions: functional daily activities, such as sit-to-standing, produce greater muscle activity than static bed exercises in healthy older adults. Sit-to-stands should be included in exercise and rehabilitation programs for older adults to evoke sufficient levels of neuromuscular activation for muscle strength adaptation.
139-148
Gavin, James Peter
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Immins, Tikki
94a80bd2-c2f2-4f1b-b04a-4f03e29a2eac
Burgess, Louise C
5c27e153-afaf-4032-8aac-70875eaf89e1
Wainwright, Tom W
18f5ff6a-584b-45b0-b6fb-b2f850ba1014
Gavin, James Peter
e0d9b404-3f63-4855-8e64-bf1692e6cc3f
Immins, Tikki
94a80bd2-c2f2-4f1b-b04a-4f03e29a2eac
Burgess, Louise C
5c27e153-afaf-4032-8aac-70875eaf89e1
Wainwright, Tom W
18f5ff6a-584b-45b0-b6fb-b2f850ba1014

Gavin, James Peter, Immins, Tikki, Burgess, Louise C and Wainwright, Tom W (2018) Functional sit-to-stands evoke greater neuromuscular activation than orthopaedic bed exercises in healthy older adults. Isokinetics and Exercise Science, 26 (2), 139-148, [26]. (doi:10.3233/IES-182115).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: to compare EMG activity of the hip and thigh muscles during traditional static bed exercises and the sit-to-stand exercise in healthy older adults.

Methods: twenty-four healthy, older adults (8 males; age 65 ± 7 y) performed four static rehabilitation exercises: isometric contractions of the gluteal, abductor, inner quadriceps and quadriceps (ten, ∼ 5 s submaximal contractions, with 60 rests), and the sit-to-stand test. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, gluteus medius, biceps femoris and gluteus maximus, and root mean square-processed (RMS) in this observational preliminary study. Handgrip strength and 10 m walking speed represented participant characteristics.

Results: hip and thigh muscles were activated differently between the isometric bed and sit-to-stand exercises. Greatest RMS activity was shown in the chair rising phase of the sit-to-stand exercise. No bed exercise exceeded the muscle RMS activity required to perform a sit-to-stand, and only for sit-to-stands were all muscles activated over 40% of maximal; the level required to stimulate muscle strength adaptation.

Conclusions: functional daily activities, such as sit-to-standing, produce greater muscle activity than static bed exercises in healthy older adults. Sit-to-stands should be included in exercise and rehabilitation programs for older adults to evoke sufficient levels of neuromuscular activation for muscle strength adaptation.

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Gavin et al. 2018_sit_stands - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 June 2018
Published date: 15 June 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428647
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428647
PURE UUID: ff2180c3-a952-48b4-88fd-0783d1b21aad
ORCID for James Peter Gavin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0574-0502

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Date deposited: 05 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 03:24

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Contributors

Author: Tikki Immins
Author: Louise C Burgess
Author: Tom W Wainwright

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