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Immunological studies of rat metrial gland cells

Immunological studies of rat metrial gland cells
Immunological studies of rat metrial gland cells
Using a collagenase digestion technique, viable single cell suspensions have been obtained from metrial glands of the pregnant rat uterus and from metrial glands of the deciduomata of the pseudopregnant rat uterus. The cell suspensions have been examined for a series of immunological markers to help define a functional role for the metrial gland.

Immunoglobulin (Fcϒ) receptors have been detected on the fibroblast-like stromal cells of the metrial gland using an EAϒ resetting technique in which SRBCs were sensitised with rabbit or rat anti-SRBC IgG. Considerably mwre cells formed EAϒ rosettes with rabbit sensitised SRBCs than with rat sensitised SRBCs. Metrial gland cells from day 13 multiparous animals formed significantly more EAϒ rosettes than cells from day 13 uniparous animals. Rosette formation with both sensitising antibodies was inhibited by low concentrations of monomeric or heat aggregated IgGs. Rabbit IgG inhibited rosette formation by rabbit sensitised SRBCs to a greater extent than rat IgG and rat IgG inhibited rosette formation by rat sensitised SRBCs to a greater degree than rabbit IgG. EAϒ rosette formation by peritoneal macrophages was only inhibited with heat aggregated IgGs.

Surface IgG has been detected on a small, but significant, proportion of metrial gland cells using an Fabϒ fraction of a rabbit anti-rat IgG antibody. This finding has been discussed in relation to the idea that granulated metrial gland cells are derived from lymphocyte-like precursors. Cytoplasmic IgG has been located in cell smears from the metrial gland, using the indirect fluorescent antibody technique, and the number of positive cells has been quantified. This number showed a close correlation with the number of cells containing diastase-fast PAS positive granules in cell smears. Recent observations on tissue sections revealed that it is the granulated metrial gland cells which contain the IgG.

The Fcϒ receptors, surface IgG and cytoplasmic IgG all appear to be on different cell types and there do not appear to be any differences between the metrial gland cells observed in pregnancy and those observed in the deciduomata of pseudopregnancy. Several possible functions are proposed for the metrial gland and are discussed in relation to the immunology of pregnancy.
University of Southampton
Craggs, Ian
42f2f582-e64a-40f8-8679-ef36b08ab7f8
Craggs, Ian
42f2f582-e64a-40f8-8679-ef36b08ab7f8
Peel, S.
fd37f3c5-584a-403b-9d1c-992fe753c3d3

Craggs, Ian (1980) Immunological studies of rat metrial gland cells. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 182pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Using a collagenase digestion technique, viable single cell suspensions have been obtained from metrial glands of the pregnant rat uterus and from metrial glands of the deciduomata of the pseudopregnant rat uterus. The cell suspensions have been examined for a series of immunological markers to help define a functional role for the metrial gland.

Immunoglobulin (Fcϒ) receptors have been detected on the fibroblast-like stromal cells of the metrial gland using an EAϒ resetting technique in which SRBCs were sensitised with rabbit or rat anti-SRBC IgG. Considerably mwre cells formed EAϒ rosettes with rabbit sensitised SRBCs than with rat sensitised SRBCs. Metrial gland cells from day 13 multiparous animals formed significantly more EAϒ rosettes than cells from day 13 uniparous animals. Rosette formation with both sensitising antibodies was inhibited by low concentrations of monomeric or heat aggregated IgGs. Rabbit IgG inhibited rosette formation by rabbit sensitised SRBCs to a greater extent than rat IgG and rat IgG inhibited rosette formation by rat sensitised SRBCs to a greater degree than rabbit IgG. EAϒ rosette formation by peritoneal macrophages was only inhibited with heat aggregated IgGs.

Surface IgG has been detected on a small, but significant, proportion of metrial gland cells using an Fabϒ fraction of a rabbit anti-rat IgG antibody. This finding has been discussed in relation to the idea that granulated metrial gland cells are derived from lymphocyte-like precursors. Cytoplasmic IgG has been located in cell smears from the metrial gland, using the indirect fluorescent antibody technique, and the number of positive cells has been quantified. This number showed a close correlation with the number of cells containing diastase-fast PAS positive granules in cell smears. Recent observations on tissue sections revealed that it is the granulated metrial gland cells which contain the IgG.

The Fcϒ receptors, surface IgG and cytoplasmic IgG all appear to be on different cell types and there do not appear to be any differences between the metrial gland cells observed in pregnancy and those observed in the deciduomata of pseudopregnancy. Several possible functions are proposed for the metrial gland and are discussed in relation to the immunology of pregnancy.

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Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: 1 October 1980

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428663
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428663
PURE UUID: 4836e32d-099e-4bff-a011-cac5164047b2

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Date deposited: 06 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 28 Jun 2019 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Ian Craggs
Thesis advisor: S. Peel

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