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Biotribology of the ageing skin- why we should care

Biotribology of the ageing skin- why we should care
Biotribology of the ageing skin- why we should care
Ageing of populations has emerged as one of the most pressing societal, economic and healthcare challenges currently facing most nations across the globe. The ageing process itself results in degradation of physiological functions and biophysical properties of organs and tissues, and more particularly those of the skin. Moreover, in both developed and emerging economies, population ageing parallels concerning increases in lifestyle-associated conditions such as Type 2 diabetes, obesity and skin cancers. When considered together, these demographic trends call for even greater urgency to find clinical and engineering solutions for the numerous age-related deficits in skin function.
From a tribological perspective, detrimental alterations of skin biophysical properties with age have fundamental consequences on how one interacts with the body’s inner and outer environments. This stems from the fact that, besides being the largest organ of the human body, and also nearly covering its entirety, the skin is a multifunctional interface which mediates these interactions.
The aim of this paper is to present a focused review to discuss some of the consequences of skin ageing from the viewpoint of biotribology, and their implications on health, well-being and human activities. Current and future research questions/challenges associated with biotribology of the ageing skin are outlined. They provide the background and motivation for identifying future lines of research that could be taken up by the biotribology and biophysics communities.
Skin, biotribology, ageing, aging, geriatrics, mechanical properties, microstructure, health, well-being, skin tear, pressure ulcer, tactile perception, friction, wrinkle
2352-5738
Limbert, Georges
a1b88cb4-c5d9-4c6e-b6c9-7f4c4aa1c2ec
Masen, Marc A
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Pond, D.
01df0dc6-df68-44bd-befa-ff73f550d45c
Graham, Helen K
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Sherratt, Michael J
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Jobanputra, Rikeen
d3b3dfdc-ec39-497b-887e-975b67608438
McBride, Andrew
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Limbert, Georges
a1b88cb4-c5d9-4c6e-b6c9-7f4c4aa1c2ec
Masen, Marc A
f762f15a-e281-4c83-bf46-d698f681c6ec
Pond, D.
01df0dc6-df68-44bd-befa-ff73f550d45c
Graham, Helen K
fef58d5c-0ad6-4f2c-b474-9cb0bdb97eb1
Sherratt, Michael J
297f1152-8194-4d73-a9ff-8013cee01346
Jobanputra, Rikeen
d3b3dfdc-ec39-497b-887e-975b67608438
McBride, Andrew
258031e9-09c3-447a-84d7-eb87e056c559

Limbert, Georges, Masen, Marc A, Pond, D., Graham, Helen K, Sherratt, Michael J, Jobanputra, Rikeen and McBride, Andrew (2019) Biotribology of the ageing skin- why we should care. Biotribology. (doi:10.1016/j.biotri.2019.03.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Ageing of populations has emerged as one of the most pressing societal, economic and healthcare challenges currently facing most nations across the globe. The ageing process itself results in degradation of physiological functions and biophysical properties of organs and tissues, and more particularly those of the skin. Moreover, in both developed and emerging economies, population ageing parallels concerning increases in lifestyle-associated conditions such as Type 2 diabetes, obesity and skin cancers. When considered together, these demographic trends call for even greater urgency to find clinical and engineering solutions for the numerous age-related deficits in skin function.
From a tribological perspective, detrimental alterations of skin biophysical properties with age have fundamental consequences on how one interacts with the body’s inner and outer environments. This stems from the fact that, besides being the largest organ of the human body, and also nearly covering its entirety, the skin is a multifunctional interface which mediates these interactions.
The aim of this paper is to present a focused review to discuss some of the consequences of skin ageing from the viewpoint of biotribology, and their implications on health, well-being and human activities. Current and future research questions/challenges associated with biotribology of the ageing skin are outlined. They provide the background and motivation for identifying future lines of research that could be taken up by the biotribology and biophysics communities.

Text
Biotribology [Limbert et al.] Ageing of the skin (accepted 1 March 2019)... - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 March 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 March 2019
Keywords: Skin, biotribology, ageing, aging, geriatrics, mechanical properties, microstructure, health, well-being, skin tear, pressure ulcer, tactile perception, friction, wrinkle

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428672
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428672
ISSN: 2352-5738
PURE UUID: 472b4ac7-6095-4dbf-83e8-63a0cb91923c

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Date deposited: 06 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 07:12

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Contributors

Author: Georges Limbert
Author: Marc A Masen
Author: D. Pond
Author: Helen K Graham
Author: Michael J Sherratt
Author: Rikeen Jobanputra
Author: Andrew McBride

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