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Multi-domain analysis of microvascular flow motion dynamics

Multi-domain analysis of microvascular flow motion dynamics
Multi-domain analysis of microvascular flow motion dynamics
Objective: to determine whether analysis of microvascular network perfusion using complexitybased methods can discriminate between groups of individuals at an increased risk of developing CVD.

Methods: data were obtained from laser Doppler recordings of skin blood flux at the forearm in 50 participants with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease grouped for absence (n=28) or presence (n=14) of type 2 diabetes and use of calcium channel blocker medication (n=8). Power spectral density was evaluated and Lempel-Ziv complexity determined to quantify signal information content at single and multiple time-scales to account for the different processes modulating network perfusion.

Results: complexity was associated with dilatory capacity and respiration and negatively with baseline blood flux and cardiac band power. The relationship between the modulators of flowmotion and complexity of blood flux is shown to change with time-scale improving discrimination between groups. Multiscale Lempel-Ziv achieved best classification accuracy of 86.1%.

Conclusions: time and frequency domain measures alone are insufficient to discriminate between groups. As CVD risk increases, the degree of complexity of the blood flux signal reduces, indicative of a reduced temporal activity and heterogeneous distribution of blood flow within the microvascular network sampled. Complexity-based methods, particularly multiscale variants, are shown to have good discriminatory capabilities.
microcirculation, blood flow, flow motion, frequency analysis, complexity
1073-9688
Chipperfield, Andrew
524269cd-5f30-4356-92d4-891c14c09340
Thanaj, Marjola
fb9baacc-4255-483d-8efa-e4fa983a9b2f
Scorletti, Eleonora
42bb0659-ac67-4a73-bf36-a881fe6c1563
Byrne, Christopher
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Clough, Geraldine
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494
Chipperfield, Andrew
524269cd-5f30-4356-92d4-891c14c09340
Thanaj, Marjola
fb9baacc-4255-483d-8efa-e4fa983a9b2f
Scorletti, Eleonora
42bb0659-ac67-4a73-bf36-a881fe6c1563
Byrne, Christopher
1370b997-cead-4229-83a7-53301ed2a43c
Clough, Geraldine
9f19639e-a929-4976-ac35-259f9011c494

Chipperfield, Andrew, Thanaj, Marjola, Scorletti, Eleonora, Byrne, Christopher and Clough, Geraldine (2019) Multi-domain analysis of microvascular flow motion dynamics. Microcirculation, 26 (5), [e12538]. (doi:10.1111/micc.12538).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: to determine whether analysis of microvascular network perfusion using complexitybased methods can discriminate between groups of individuals at an increased risk of developing CVD.

Methods: data were obtained from laser Doppler recordings of skin blood flux at the forearm in 50 participants with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease grouped for absence (n=28) or presence (n=14) of type 2 diabetes and use of calcium channel blocker medication (n=8). Power spectral density was evaluated and Lempel-Ziv complexity determined to quantify signal information content at single and multiple time-scales to account for the different processes modulating network perfusion.

Results: complexity was associated with dilatory capacity and respiration and negatively with baseline blood flux and cardiac band power. The relationship between the modulators of flowmotion and complexity of blood flux is shown to change with time-scale improving discrimination between groups. Multiscale Lempel-Ziv achieved best classification accuracy of 86.1%.

Conclusions: time and frequency domain measures alone are insufficient to discriminate between groups. As CVD risk increases, the degree of complexity of the blood flux signal reduces, indicative of a reduced temporal activity and heterogeneous distribution of blood flow within the microvascular network sampled. Complexity-based methods, particularly multiscale variants, are shown to have good discriminatory capabilities.

Text
Microcirc (Chipperfield) STI Complexity in the microcirculation 210219 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 February 2019
Published date: 26 July 2019
Additional Information: Special Issue: Complexity in the Microcirculation
Keywords: microcirculation, blood flow, flow motion, frequency analysis, complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428673
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428673
ISSN: 1073-9688
PURE UUID: 83f430db-b5f9-4a03-82aa-a2d2950efd56
ORCID for Andrew Chipperfield: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3026-9890
ORCID for Marjola Thanaj: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1789-7112
ORCID for Christopher Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6322-7753
ORCID for Geraldine Clough: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6226-8964

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:13

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Contributors

Author: Marjola Thanaj ORCID iD
Author: Eleonora Scorletti

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