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Ethnicity and satisfaction with social care in England: Measurement, determinants, and outcomes

Ethnicity and satisfaction with social care in England: Measurement, determinants, and outcomes
Ethnicity and satisfaction with social care in England: Measurement, determinants, and outcomes
Satisfaction with social care services is routinely measured with Likert scales, and surveys have consistently found that people from minority ethnic groups are less satisfied than white people in England. These surveys cannot explain the reasons for the differences found. Therefore, qualitative interviews (n=121) with South Asian and White British service users, family carers, and social care staff were carried out to explore reasons for high or low satisfaction. Thematic analysis focused on three areas: (i) the satisfaction measurement itself, (ii) reasons for satisfaction, and (iii) how staff coped with working across diversity. People who gave the same responses to the Likert scale actually had very different experiences, indicating both that the surveys do not capture the full story and also that individuals understand the scale differently. People with a clear understanding of the social care system were better able to work collaboratively with care staff to meet their needs, and thus had a higher satisfaction level. A clear understanding is facilitated by greater opportunities to become familiar with the social care system, and so first-generation migrants are disadvantaged compared to the British-born. Finally, social care staff who adopted a culturally reflexive working style, and were comfortable asking questions about cultural or religious difference, were more confident working with clients who differed from themselves. Recommendations are to include a qualitative component in satisfaction surveys, increase outreach communication about how social care services work, and to encourage staff to recognise and discuss diversity.
Willis, Rosalind
dd2e5e10-58bf-44ca-9c04-f355f3af26ba
Khambhaita, Priya
30115f1a-b0fc-462c-91f3-d52e3a66a7dc
Pathak, Pathik
29d3480f-191e-4caf-8cf6-3d3836ec39c5
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28
Willis, Rosalind
dd2e5e10-58bf-44ca-9c04-f355f3af26ba
Khambhaita, Priya
30115f1a-b0fc-462c-91f3-d52e3a66a7dc
Pathak, Pathik
29d3480f-191e-4caf-8cf6-3d3836ec39c5
Evandrou, Maria
cd2210ea-9625-44d7-b0f4-fc0721a25d28

Willis, Rosalind, Khambhaita, Priya, Pathak, Pathik and Evandrou, Maria (2017) Ethnicity and satisfaction with social care in England: Measurement, determinants, and outcomes. 21st IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, United States. 23 - 27 Jul 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Satisfaction with social care services is routinely measured with Likert scales, and surveys have consistently found that people from minority ethnic groups are less satisfied than white people in England. These surveys cannot explain the reasons for the differences found. Therefore, qualitative interviews (n=121) with South Asian and White British service users, family carers, and social care staff were carried out to explore reasons for high or low satisfaction. Thematic analysis focused on three areas: (i) the satisfaction measurement itself, (ii) reasons for satisfaction, and (iii) how staff coped with working across diversity. People who gave the same responses to the Likert scale actually had very different experiences, indicating both that the surveys do not capture the full story and also that individuals understand the scale differently. People with a clear understanding of the social care system were better able to work collaboratively with care staff to meet their needs, and thus had a higher satisfaction level. A clear understanding is facilitated by greater opportunities to become familiar with the social care system, and so first-generation migrants are disadvantaged compared to the British-born. Finally, social care staff who adopted a culturally reflexive working style, and were comfortable asking questions about cultural or religious difference, were more confident working with clients who differed from themselves. Recommendations are to include a qualitative component in satisfaction surveys, increase outreach communication about how social care services work, and to encourage staff to recognise and discuss diversity.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 23 July 2017
Venue - Dates: 21st IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, United States, 2017-07-23 - 2017-07-27

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428912
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428912
PURE UUID: 2ed1a6f3-f44d-4a1d-b672-b46fb97d2c06
ORCID for Rosalind Willis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6687-5799
ORCID for Maria Evandrou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2115-9358

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Mar 2019 19:35
Last modified: 30 Jan 2020 01:37

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