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Digital generations, but not as we know them

Digital generations, but not as we know them
Digital generations, but not as we know them

The aim of this article is to see whether or not adolescents were the real leaders of the digital ‘revolution’ in the 1990s and whether they have sustained or even improved their position in the 2000s. The analysis is based on two surveys carried out in Italy, France, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Spain in 1996 (N = 6609) and in 2009 (N = 7255). The results show that the adolescents belonging to the first digital generation in 1996 were the most equipped with new technologies, although not the most intensive users. In 2009, the adolescents lost their position as the leading adopters and lagged behind youth and young adults regarding the use of new technologies and computer skills.

Adolescents, digital generation, digital native generation, digital technology, digital technology diffusion, digital technology use, EU5, young adults, youth
1354-8565
95-112
Fortunati, Leopoldina
e6fdeb8c-22f6-4cb4-b30f-05f67e3c6536
Taipale, Sakari
86d31939-c06b-4c5e-bbcb-3112575daf51
de Luca, Federico
f6a71481-e8da-4ad9-a967-4b12b37efa74
Fortunati, Leopoldina
e6fdeb8c-22f6-4cb4-b30f-05f67e3c6536
Taipale, Sakari
86d31939-c06b-4c5e-bbcb-3112575daf51
de Luca, Federico
f6a71481-e8da-4ad9-a967-4b12b37efa74

Fortunati, Leopoldina, Taipale, Sakari and de Luca, Federico (2019) Digital generations, but not as we know them. Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, 25 (1), 95-112. (doi:10.1177/1354856517692309).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The aim of this article is to see whether or not adolescents were the real leaders of the digital ‘revolution’ in the 1990s and whether they have sustained or even improved their position in the 2000s. The analysis is based on two surveys carried out in Italy, France, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Spain in 1996 (N = 6609) and in 2009 (N = 7255). The results show that the adolescents belonging to the first digital generation in 1996 were the most equipped with new technologies, although not the most intensive users. In 2009, the adolescents lost their position as the leading adopters and lagged behind youth and young adults regarding the use of new technologies and computer skills.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 9 February 2017
Published date: 1 February 2019
Keywords: Adolescents, digital generation, digital native generation, digital technology, digital technology diffusion, digital technology use, EU5, young adults, youth

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428955
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428955
ISSN: 1354-8565
PURE UUID: 6500d20e-737d-4ee7-b18e-ccb23f7816f5

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 15 Mar 2019 17:30

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