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Examining links between dust deposition and phytoplankton response using ice cores

Examining links between dust deposition and phytoplankton response using ice cores
Examining links between dust deposition and phytoplankton response using ice cores
Dust is a major source of nutrients to remote ocean environments, influencing primary productivity (PP). Enhanced oceanic PP causes drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and is considered likely to be a driver of climate variability on glacial-interglacial timeframes. However, the scale of this relationship and its operation over shorter timescales remains uncertain, while it is unclear whether dust fertilisation, or other mechanisms, e.g. nutrient upwelling, are the primary driver of PP in high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) ocean regions. In this study, we demonstrate, using dust derived Fe and Methanesulfonic acid (a measure of ocean PP) deposition in ice cores from the South Atlantic (South Georgia Island) and North Pacific (Yukon), that PP is significantly correlated with Dust-Fe on both an event and annual scale. However, measuring the relationship between (dust) Fe fertilization and PP in high resolution ice cores is subject to a number of highly complex factors, which are discussed and together used to recommend future research directions. In conclusion, our research suggests that changes in aeolian Fe flux, due to climate change and human activity in dust source regions, could have significant implications for HNLC ocean PP and, therefore potentially, carbon sequestration.
1875-9637
45-60
Hooper, James
b65521ef-1402-4b05-b72d-06e854f94624
Mayewski, Paul
367fe005-36a2-4185-bba7-0794e30905ab
Marx, Samuel
59f98951-2f50-4a96-8d6e-bfaea5a109a3
Henson, Stephanie
d6532e17-a65b-4d7b-9ee3-755ecb565c19
Potocki, Mariusz
bab4f9a8-aea8-4a12-a0cd-55ec28aa4ad1
Sneed, Sharon
67fb6995-d502-4252-a128-17b9c1576d2f
Handley, Mike
78558965-12ed-4ea9-b272-439270e5ef49
Gassó, Santiago
12e9d2b1-3999-4976-bf05-974f197400da
Fischer, Matthew
840153f7-daee-4576-a7cd-01086d7136a8
Saunders, Krystyna M.
c2b9040d-29d4-40df-ba38-71c586bff12b
Hooper, James
b65521ef-1402-4b05-b72d-06e854f94624
Mayewski, Paul
367fe005-36a2-4185-bba7-0794e30905ab
Marx, Samuel
59f98951-2f50-4a96-8d6e-bfaea5a109a3
Henson, Stephanie
d6532e17-a65b-4d7b-9ee3-755ecb565c19
Potocki, Mariusz
bab4f9a8-aea8-4a12-a0cd-55ec28aa4ad1
Sneed, Sharon
67fb6995-d502-4252-a128-17b9c1576d2f
Handley, Mike
78558965-12ed-4ea9-b272-439270e5ef49
Gassó, Santiago
12e9d2b1-3999-4976-bf05-974f197400da
Fischer, Matthew
840153f7-daee-4576-a7cd-01086d7136a8
Saunders, Krystyna M.
c2b9040d-29d4-40df-ba38-71c586bff12b

Hooper, James, Mayewski, Paul, Marx, Samuel, Henson, Stephanie, Potocki, Mariusz, Sneed, Sharon, Handley, Mike, Gassó, Santiago, Fischer, Matthew and Saunders, Krystyna M. (2019) Examining links between dust deposition and phytoplankton response using ice cores. Aeolian Research, 36, 45-60. (doi:10.1016/j.aeolia.2018.11.001).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dust is a major source of nutrients to remote ocean environments, influencing primary productivity (PP). Enhanced oceanic PP causes drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and is considered likely to be a driver of climate variability on glacial-interglacial timeframes. However, the scale of this relationship and its operation over shorter timescales remains uncertain, while it is unclear whether dust fertilisation, or other mechanisms, e.g. nutrient upwelling, are the primary driver of PP in high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) ocean regions. In this study, we demonstrate, using dust derived Fe and Methanesulfonic acid (a measure of ocean PP) deposition in ice cores from the South Atlantic (South Georgia Island) and North Pacific (Yukon), that PP is significantly correlated with Dust-Fe on both an event and annual scale. However, measuring the relationship between (dust) Fe fertilization and PP in high resolution ice cores is subject to a number of highly complex factors, which are discussed and together used to recommend future research directions. In conclusion, our research suggests that changes in aeolian Fe flux, due to climate change and human activity in dust source regions, could have significant implications for HNLC ocean PP and, therefore potentially, carbon sequestration.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 November 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 November 2018
Published date: 1 February 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 428970
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/428970
ISSN: 1875-9637
PURE UUID: 0bfc46ab-df1f-4ff7-882a-6b87c6429dd2

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Date deposited: 15 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 15 Mar 2019 17:30

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Contributors

Author: James Hooper
Author: Paul Mayewski
Author: Samuel Marx
Author: Mariusz Potocki
Author: Sharon Sneed
Author: Mike Handley
Author: Santiago Gassó
Author: Matthew Fischer
Author: Krystyna M. Saunders

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