The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Political socialization, worry about crime and antisocial behaviour: an analysis of age, period and cohort effects

Political socialization, worry about crime and antisocial behaviour: an analysis of age, period and cohort effects
Political socialization, worry about crime and antisocial behaviour: an analysis of age, period and cohort effects

Fear of crime occupies a substantial area of research and theorizing in criminology. Yet, it has not been examined within a longitudinal framework of political socialization. Using insights from generational modelling, we explore how political cohorts influence the fear of crime and perceptions of antisocial behaviour. This 'age, period and cohort' (APC) approach recognizes the distinct temporal processes of (1) individual ageing, (2) current contexts and (3) generational membership and is crucial to understanding the origins and shape of social change. We employ repeated crosssectional data from the British Crime Survey in an APC analysis to explore how worry about crime and perceptions of antisocial behaviour were impacted by the sociopolitical environment in which respondents spent their 'formative years'. Our results underline the theoretical significance of political socialization and the methodological consequence of longitudinal analyses when exploring public perceptions of crime. We find that political socialization can have a distinctive and enduring impression on public perceptions of crime from childhood into middle age.

age-period-cohort, antisocial behaviour, fear of crime, political generations
0007-0955
435-460
Gray, Emily
aeada2be-fc98-459f-96bb-434441f07349
Grasso, Maria
60f8342f-73d8-41cb-bc72-a1d2bfb54fa0
Farrall, Stephen
c0bf4481-60fd-46f3-bc13-114bf4e58dd3
Jennings, Will
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7
Hay, Colin
1dc2c1eb-c9bc-4f6a-ad7a-aa0038689217
Gray, Emily
aeada2be-fc98-459f-96bb-434441f07349
Grasso, Maria
60f8342f-73d8-41cb-bc72-a1d2bfb54fa0
Farrall, Stephen
c0bf4481-60fd-46f3-bc13-114bf4e58dd3
Jennings, Will
2ab3f11c-eb7f-44c6-9ef2-3180c1a954f7
Hay, Colin
1dc2c1eb-c9bc-4f6a-ad7a-aa0038689217

Gray, Emily, Grasso, Maria, Farrall, Stephen, Jennings, Will and Hay, Colin (2019) Political socialization, worry about crime and antisocial behaviour: an analysis of age, period and cohort effects. British Journal of Criminology, 59 (2), 435-460. (doi:10.1093/bjc/azy024).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Fear of crime occupies a substantial area of research and theorizing in criminology. Yet, it has not been examined within a longitudinal framework of political socialization. Using insights from generational modelling, we explore how political cohorts influence the fear of crime and perceptions of antisocial behaviour. This 'age, period and cohort' (APC) approach recognizes the distinct temporal processes of (1) individual ageing, (2) current contexts and (3) generational membership and is crucial to understanding the origins and shape of social change. We employ repeated crosssectional data from the British Crime Survey in an APC analysis to explore how worry about crime and perceptions of antisocial behaviour were impacted by the sociopolitical environment in which respondents spent their 'formative years'. Our results underline the theoretical significance of political socialization and the methodological consequence of longitudinal analyses when exploring public perceptions of crime. We find that political socialization can have a distinctive and enduring impression on public perceptions of crime from childhood into middle age.

Text
azy024 - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (610kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 7 August 2018
Published date: March 2019
Keywords: age-period-cohort, antisocial behaviour, fear of crime, political generations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429041
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429041
ISSN: 0007-0955
PURE UUID: 1f01c3d5-0bea-45df-8277-588c411a036f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 02 Apr 2019 16:30

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×