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Weight bias, health consciousness and behavioral actions (activities)

Weight bias, health consciousness and behavioral actions (activities)
Weight bias, health consciousness and behavioral actions (activities)

Objective This study examines the influence of weight bias and health consciousness on eating and dietary behavior; it also investigates the role of normative influences. Design and methods A sample of adults living in South-East England (N = 498) completed anonymous questionnaires about their diet, attitudes and beliefs towards obese people, health consciousness and normative influences. The survey included validated measures of anti-fat attitudes, and beliefs about obese people. Results The findings demonstrate anti-fat attitudes are positively related to self-perceived dietary behavior. Surprisingly, self-perceived dietary behavior is negatively related to health consciousness and activities designed to enable healthy eating, for example meal planning. Significant differences exist between people with, or without, obese family members. Conclusions Attempts to improve eating behavior by raising health consciousness and offering related support activities may fail; promoting health eating may also contribute to weight bias in society. However, interventions which focus on the negative impact of obesity itself may have a positive effect.

1471-0153
200-205
Wood, Matthew
11b512d7-62b1-4c68-964c-1ba6189ccbc9
Shukla, Paurav
d3acd968-350b-40cf-890b-12c2e7aaa49d
Wood, Matthew
11b512d7-62b1-4c68-964c-1ba6189ccbc9
Shukla, Paurav
d3acd968-350b-40cf-890b-12c2e7aaa49d

Wood, Matthew and Shukla, Paurav (2016) Weight bias, health consciousness and behavioral actions (activities). Eating Behaviors, 23, 200-205. (doi:10.1016/j.eatbeh.2016.10.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective This study examines the influence of weight bias and health consciousness on eating and dietary behavior; it also investigates the role of normative influences. Design and methods A sample of adults living in South-East England (N = 498) completed anonymous questionnaires about their diet, attitudes and beliefs towards obese people, health consciousness and normative influences. The survey included validated measures of anti-fat attitudes, and beliefs about obese people. Results The findings demonstrate anti-fat attitudes are positively related to self-perceived dietary behavior. Surprisingly, self-perceived dietary behavior is negatively related to health consciousness and activities designed to enable healthy eating, for example meal planning. Significant differences exist between people with, or without, obese family members. Conclusions Attempts to improve eating behavior by raising health consciousness and offering related support activities may fail; promoting health eating may also contribute to weight bias in society. However, interventions which focus on the negative impact of obesity itself may have a positive effect.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 October 2016
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 October 2016
Published date: 1 December 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429057
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429057
ISSN: 1471-0153
PURE UUID: 3744739c-8ca7-4325-8a9f-e46462a2903a
ORCID for Paurav Shukla: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1957-8622

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 20 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2019 01:21

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Contributors

Author: Matthew Wood
Author: Paurav Shukla ORCID iD

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