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Effects of whole-body vibration waveform and display collimation on the performance of a complex manual control task

Effects of whole-body vibration waveform and display collimation on the performance of a complex manual control task
Effects of whole-body vibration waveform and display collimation on the performance of a complex manual control task

An experiment is described in which two independent groups of eight subjects each performed a combined continuous and discrete tracking task during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration. Both groups received sinusoidal and random vibration at preferred third-octave centre frequencies of 0.5-10 Hz. One group performed the task with the display collimated by a convex lens. Without the collimation, performance was disrupted by both types of vibration at all vibration frequencies; collimation removed the disruption of frequencies above 1.6 Hz. There were differences in the effects of random and sinusiodal vibration at 2.0 and 2.5 Hz, suggesting that compensatory eye movements wre assisting performance during exposure to the predictable sinusoidal motion. The results show that continuous control performance was disrupted by visual interference at frequencies above 1.6 Hz; closed-loop system transfer functions showed that visual interference increased the phase lags which impaired control perfomance. Possible mechanisms explaining the disruption in performance at lower frequencies are discussed.

0095-6562
211-219
Mcleod, R. W.
a8936cb6-07b8-4353-8116-68ab0637e6a2
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Mcleod, R. W.
a8936cb6-07b8-4353-8116-68ab0637e6a2
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Mcleod, R. W. and Griffin, M. J. (1990) Effects of whole-body vibration waveform and display collimation on the performance of a complex manual control task. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, 61 (3), 211-219.

Record type: Article

Abstract

An experiment is described in which two independent groups of eight subjects each performed a combined continuous and discrete tracking task during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration. Both groups received sinusoidal and random vibration at preferred third-octave centre frequencies of 0.5-10 Hz. One group performed the task with the display collimated by a convex lens. Without the collimation, performance was disrupted by both types of vibration at all vibration frequencies; collimation removed the disruption of frequencies above 1.6 Hz. There were differences in the effects of random and sinusiodal vibration at 2.0 and 2.5 Hz, suggesting that compensatory eye movements wre assisting performance during exposure to the predictable sinusoidal motion. The results show that continuous control performance was disrupted by visual interference at frequencies above 1.6 Hz; closed-loop system transfer functions showed that visual interference increased the phase lags which impaired control perfomance. Possible mechanisms explaining the disruption in performance at lower frequencies are discussed.

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More information

Published date: 8 May 1990

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429165
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429165
ISSN: 0095-6562
PURE UUID: fd0f7ba4-9352-483a-9805-899949152eaf
ORCID for M. J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 22 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 23 Mar 2019 01:38

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