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Effects of whole-body vibration on short-term memory

Effects of whole-body vibration on short-term memory
Effects of whole-body vibration on short-term memory

An experiment has been conducted to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration on cognitive performance independent of the direct mechanical action of vibration on vision and manual control. Sixteen subjects completed a short-term memory task (memory scanning) during exposure to 16 Hz sinusoidal whole-body vibration at four magnitudes: 0, 1.0, 1.6, and 2.5 ms-2 r.m.s. The results show a detrimental effect of vibration on performance when measured by mean reaction time (p < 0.001) and number of attentional lapses (p < 0.01). Response errors rose significantly during the 1.0 ms-2 r.m.s. condition alone. The data suggest that vibration disrupts central cognitive mechanisms utilized during the processing of information in short-term memory, although compensatory cognitive procedures may exist to minimise these effects.

0095-6562
1092-1097
Sherwood, N.
a5e762ec-4c48-456f-acad-bd59e2771fc3
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Sherwood, N.
a5e762ec-4c48-456f-acad-bd59e2771fc3
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Sherwood, N. and Griffin, M. J. (1990) Effects of whole-body vibration on short-term memory. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, 61 (12), 1092-1097.

Record type: Article

Abstract

An experiment has been conducted to investigate the effects of whole-body vibration on cognitive performance independent of the direct mechanical action of vibration on vision and manual control. Sixteen subjects completed a short-term memory task (memory scanning) during exposure to 16 Hz sinusoidal whole-body vibration at four magnitudes: 0, 1.0, 1.6, and 2.5 ms-2 r.m.s. The results show a detrimental effect of vibration on performance when measured by mean reaction time (p < 0.001) and number of attentional lapses (p < 0.01). Response errors rose significantly during the 1.0 ms-2 r.m.s. condition alone. The data suggest that vibration disrupts central cognitive mechanisms utilized during the processing of information in short-term memory, although compensatory cognitive procedures may exist to minimise these effects.

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Published date: 1 December 1990

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429166
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429166
ISSN: 0095-6562
PURE UUID: 12ab6d5e-d773-4454-b659-33972ac8c35d
ORCID for M. J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 22 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 23 Mar 2019 01:38

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