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Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous) thrombosis in children

Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous) thrombosis in children
Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous) thrombosis in children

Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous) thrombosis (CSVT) in childhood is a rare, but underrecognized, disorder, typically of multifactorial etiology, with neurologic sequelae apparent in up to 40% of survivors and mortality approaching 10%. There is an expanding spectrum of perinatal brain injury associated with neonatal CSVT. Although there is considerable overlap in risk factors for CSVT in neonates and older infants and children, specific differences exist between the groups. Clinical symptoms are frequently nonspecific, which may obscure the diagnosis and delay treatment. While morbidity and mortality are significant, CSVT recurs less commonly than arterial ischemic stroke in children. Appropriate management may reduce the risk of recurrence and improve outcome, however there are no randomized controlled trials to support the use of anticoagulation in children. Although commonly employed in many centers, this practice remains controversial, highlighting the continued need for high-quality studies. This article reviews the literature pertaining to pediatric venous sinus thrombosis.

Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, CSVT, Neonatal, Pediatric, Stroke
1042-3680
511-527
Dlamini, Nomazulu
9d17b969-fd65-4620-888f-e54006d2e6dd
Billinghurst, Lori
04a7efb8-8063-425c-83bf-ad9fde325472
Kirkham, Fenella J.
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58
Dlamini, Nomazulu
9d17b969-fd65-4620-888f-e54006d2e6dd
Billinghurst, Lori
04a7efb8-8063-425c-83bf-ad9fde325472
Kirkham, Fenella J.
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58

Dlamini, Nomazulu, Billinghurst, Lori and Kirkham, Fenella J. (2010) Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous) thrombosis in children. Neurosurgery Clinics of North America, 21 (3), 511-527. (doi:10.1016/j.nec.2010.03.006).

Record type: Review

Abstract

Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous) thrombosis (CSVT) in childhood is a rare, but underrecognized, disorder, typically of multifactorial etiology, with neurologic sequelae apparent in up to 40% of survivors and mortality approaching 10%. There is an expanding spectrum of perinatal brain injury associated with neonatal CSVT. Although there is considerable overlap in risk factors for CSVT in neonates and older infants and children, specific differences exist between the groups. Clinical symptoms are frequently nonspecific, which may obscure the diagnosis and delay treatment. While morbidity and mortality are significant, CSVT recurs less commonly than arterial ischemic stroke in children. Appropriate management may reduce the risk of recurrence and improve outcome, however there are no randomized controlled trials to support the use of anticoagulation in children. Although commonly employed in many centers, this practice remains controversial, highlighting the continued need for high-quality studies. This article reviews the literature pertaining to pediatric venous sinus thrombosis.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: July 2010
Keywords: Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis, CSVT, Neonatal, Pediatric, Stroke

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429214
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429214
ISSN: 1042-3680
PURE UUID: a6d32fff-d3e0-44d9-8880-c9477d2f5d31
ORCID for Fenella J. Kirkham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2443-7958

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:46

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Contributors

Author: Nomazulu Dlamini
Author: Lori Billinghurst
Author: Fenella J. Kirkham ORCID iD

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