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Gender and drone warfare: A hauntological perspective

Gender and drone warfare: A hauntological perspective
Gender and drone warfare: A hauntological perspective
This book investigates how drone warfare is deeply gendered and how this can be explored through the methodological framework of `Haunting'. Utilising original interview data from British Reaper drone crews, the book analyses the way killing by drones complicates traditional understandings of masculinity and femininity in warfare.

As their role does not include physical risk, drone crews have been critiqued for failing to meet the masculine requirements necessary to be considered `warriors' and have been derided for feminizing war.

However, this book argues that drone warfare, and the experiences of the crews, exceeds the traditional masculine/feminine binary and suggests a new approach to explore this issue.

The framework of Haunting presented here draws on the insights of Jacques Derrida, Avery Gordon and others to highlight four key themes -- complex personhood, in/(hyper)visibility, disturbed temporality and power -- as frames through which the intersection of gender and drone warfare can be examined.

This book argues that Haunting provides a framework for both revealing and destabilizing gendered binaries of use for feminist security studies and International Relations scholars, as well as shedding light on British drone warfare. This book will be of interest to students of gender studies, sociology, war studies and critical security studies.
war, drones, gender, creative research methods
Routledge
Clark, Lindsay
12bbaa45-0d5a-49bd-ae66-04250dcec177
Clark, Lindsay
12bbaa45-0d5a-49bd-ae66-04250dcec177

Clark, Lindsay (2019) Gender and drone warfare: A hauntological perspective (Routledge Studies in Gender and Security), 1st ed. Routledge, 224pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

This book investigates how drone warfare is deeply gendered and how this can be explored through the methodological framework of `Haunting'. Utilising original interview data from British Reaper drone crews, the book analyses the way killing by drones complicates traditional understandings of masculinity and femininity in warfare.

As their role does not include physical risk, drone crews have been critiqued for failing to meet the masculine requirements necessary to be considered `warriors' and have been derided for feminizing war.

However, this book argues that drone warfare, and the experiences of the crews, exceeds the traditional masculine/feminine binary and suggests a new approach to explore this issue.

The framework of Haunting presented here draws on the insights of Jacques Derrida, Avery Gordon and others to highlight four key themes -- complex personhood, in/(hyper)visibility, disturbed temporality and power -- as frames through which the intersection of gender and drone warfare can be examined.

This book argues that Haunting provides a framework for both revealing and destabilizing gendered binaries of use for feminist security studies and International Relations scholars, as well as shedding light on British drone warfare. This book will be of interest to students of gender studies, sociology, war studies and critical security studies.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 May 2019
Published date: 2019
Keywords: war, drones, gender, creative research methods

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429331
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429331
PURE UUID: 99fbb17e-70a6-420d-bfb1-fd82abdda720

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 22 May 2019 16:30

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