The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Discomfort produced by impulsive whole-body vibration

Discomfort produced by impulsive whole-body vibration
Discomfort produced by impulsive whole-body vibration

This paper reports four whole-body vibration experiments conducted to determine the effects of “pulse” duration and combinations of “pulses” of vibration on human discomfort. The first experiment investigated the variation in discomfort with vibration duration for the frequencies 4, 8, 16, and 32 Hz and durations from one cycle of motion to 4 s. The second experiment extended the results for 8-Hz vibration to durations up to 32 s. The third experiment involved complex motions with one predominant frequency and root mean square acceleration level but differing peak levels. The final experiment investigated the effect of vibration duration at different vibration frequencies. The results of the first two experiments conflict with previous reports of a short finite integration time for human response to vibration. The data are used to devise a procedure for predicting the discomfort of the motions used in the third experiment. The procedure which is based on a “root-mean-quad” unit: rmq = [T– fToa4(t) dt]1/4 indicates that motions of the same frequency and same rms level will cause greater discomfort with increasing peak levels. The predictions are in good general agreement with the experimental results. Possible uses of the rmq unit are discussed.

0001-4966
1277-1284
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Whitham, Eleri M.
50f3c821-687a-4a7e-8e08-b3f803bd7634
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Whitham, Eleri M.
50f3c821-687a-4a7e-8e08-b3f803bd7634

Griffin, Michael J. and Whitham, Eleri M. (1980) Discomfort produced by impulsive whole-body vibration. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 68 (5), 1277-1284. (doi:10.1121/1.385121).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper reports four whole-body vibration experiments conducted to determine the effects of “pulse” duration and combinations of “pulses” of vibration on human discomfort. The first experiment investigated the variation in discomfort with vibration duration for the frequencies 4, 8, 16, and 32 Hz and durations from one cycle of motion to 4 s. The second experiment extended the results for 8-Hz vibration to durations up to 32 s. The third experiment involved complex motions with one predominant frequency and root mean square acceleration level but differing peak levels. The final experiment investigated the effect of vibration duration at different vibration frequencies. The results of the first two experiments conflict with previous reports of a short finite integration time for human response to vibration. The data are used to devise a procedure for predicting the discomfort of the motions used in the third experiment. The procedure which is based on a “root-mean-quad” unit: rmq = [T– fToa4(t) dt]1/4 indicates that motions of the same frequency and same rms level will cause greater discomfort with increasing peak levels. The predictions are in good general agreement with the experimental results. Possible uses of the rmq unit are discussed.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1 November 1980

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429441
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429441
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: 6ed2b01a-af28-4bef-84fa-e162a2101b8e
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 28 Mar 2019 01:37

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×