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Performance of a complex manual control task during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration between 0-5 and 5-0 Hz

Performance of a complex manual control task during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration between 0-5 and 5-0 Hz
Performance of a complex manual control task during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration between 0-5 and 5-0 Hz

An experiment is described in which seated subjects performed first-order pursuit tracking with a simultaneous discrete task; performance with the discrete task was dependent on performance of the continuous task. Vertical, z-axis, whole-body sinusoidal vibration was presented at frequencies from 0.5 to 5-OHz at an acceleration magnitude of 2.0 ms - r.m.s. in three separate sessions. In the first session, inter-subject and intra-subject variability masked any disruption caused by the vibration. After further training, all vibration frequencies disrupted performance of the continuous task. Disruption was independent of vibration frequency below 3-15 Hz and increased at 4.0 and 5.0 Hz A visual mechanism was assumed to account for the increased disruption at these higher frequencies. Mechanisms which may have been responsible for the disruption below 3- 15 Hz are discussed. Effects of vibration on the discrete task were attributabIe to disruption in performance of the continuous task. The results illustrate the importance of adequately training subjects prior to investigating vibration effects.

Environment, Human performance, Manual control, Whole-body vibration
0014-0139
1193-1203
McLeod, R. W.
a8936cb6-07b8-4353-8116-68ab0637e6a2
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
McLeod, R. W.
a8936cb6-07b8-4353-8116-68ab0637e6a2
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

McLeod, R. W. and Griffin, M. J. (1988) Performance of a complex manual control task during exposure to vertical whole-body vibration between 0-5 and 5-0 Hz. Ergonomics, 31 (8), 1193-1203. (doi:10.1080/00140138808966757).

Record type: Article

Abstract

An experiment is described in which seated subjects performed first-order pursuit tracking with a simultaneous discrete task; performance with the discrete task was dependent on performance of the continuous task. Vertical, z-axis, whole-body sinusoidal vibration was presented at frequencies from 0.5 to 5-OHz at an acceleration magnitude of 2.0 ms - r.m.s. in three separate sessions. In the first session, inter-subject and intra-subject variability masked any disruption caused by the vibration. After further training, all vibration frequencies disrupted performance of the continuous task. Disruption was independent of vibration frequency below 3-15 Hz and increased at 4.0 and 5.0 Hz A visual mechanism was assumed to account for the increased disruption at these higher frequencies. Mechanisms which may have been responsible for the disruption below 3- 15 Hz are discussed. Effects of vibration on the discrete task were attributabIe to disruption in performance of the continuous task. The results illustrate the importance of adequately training subjects prior to investigating vibration effects.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 15 January 1988
Published date: 1988
Keywords: Environment, Human performance, Manual control, Whole-body vibration

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429444
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429444
ISSN: 0014-0139
PURE UUID: fdee90bc-c58b-4cbd-a7e5-ec9b3412d46b
ORCID for M. J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 27 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 28 Mar 2019 01:37

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Contributors

Author: R. W. McLeod
Author: M. J. Griffin ORCID iD

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