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Effects of lags on human operator transfer functions with head-coupled systems

Effects of lags on human operator transfer functions with head-coupled systems
Effects of lags on human operator transfer functions with head-coupled systems

The effects of operator learning and target velocity on head tracking performance with and without lags has been studied. Five lags (0, 40, 80, 120, 160 ms) between head movement and target image movement, and three target velocities (2, 3.5, 5° · s-1 r.m.s.) were investigated with eight male subjects and band-limited random target motions. Head tracking transfer functions, tracking error spectra, mean radial tracking error, and subjective difficulty ratings were obtained. Head tracking performance was significantly degraded by lags greater than, or equal to, 40 ms (in addition to a system lag of 40 ms). Both the input-correlated tracking error and the uncorrelated tracking error increased with increasing lag. No significant improvement in head tracking performance was found through practice with an 80-ms lag. As the lag increased, operators increased their gains at frequencies above about 0.5 Hz and reduced their phase lags at low frequencies (about 0.1 Hz) but failed to fully compensate for the increased display lag. The increased human operator gain was associated with increased operator phase lag at higher frequencies (above 0.5 Hz). To improve head tracking performance in the presence of lags, a lag compensation technique is needed to prevent undesirable changes in tracking strategy.

0095-6562
550-556
So, R. H. Y.
c0504602-a431-4e04-99b3-c5224ad51722
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
So, R. H. Y.
c0504602-a431-4e04-99b3-c5224ad51722
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

So, R. H. Y. and Griffin, M. J. (1995) Effects of lags on human operator transfer functions with head-coupled systems. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, 66 (6), 550-556.

Record type: Article

Abstract

The effects of operator learning and target velocity on head tracking performance with and without lags has been studied. Five lags (0, 40, 80, 120, 160 ms) between head movement and target image movement, and three target velocities (2, 3.5, 5° · s-1 r.m.s.) were investigated with eight male subjects and band-limited random target motions. Head tracking transfer functions, tracking error spectra, mean radial tracking error, and subjective difficulty ratings were obtained. Head tracking performance was significantly degraded by lags greater than, or equal to, 40 ms (in addition to a system lag of 40 ms). Both the input-correlated tracking error and the uncorrelated tracking error increased with increasing lag. No significant improvement in head tracking performance was found through practice with an 80-ms lag. As the lag increased, operators increased their gains at frequencies above about 0.5 Hz and reduced their phase lags at low frequencies (about 0.1 Hz) but failed to fully compensate for the increased display lag. The increased human operator gain was associated with increased operator phase lag at higher frequencies (above 0.5 Hz). To improve head tracking performance in the presence of lags, a lag compensation technique is needed to prevent undesirable changes in tracking strategy.

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Published date: 13 June 1995

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429445
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429445
ISSN: 0095-6562
PURE UUID: 85090f7b-781e-4a12-a10d-4a31295a74d8
ORCID for M. J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 27 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 28 Mar 2019 01:37

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