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Mechanisms of vibration-induced interference with manual control performance

Mechanisms of vibration-induced interference with manual control performance
Mechanisms of vibration-induced interference with manual control performance

An experiment is described in which eight subjects performed three simple tasks (A, B and C) in static conditions and during exposure to whole-body vertical (z-axis) vibration at 0-5 and 40 Hz, at an acceleration magnitude of 2-1 ms-2 r.m.s. All subjects performed all conditions with and without an arm support. The objective was to explore the mechanisms that may cause disruption of manual control performance during vibration exposure. With task A subjects simply held a control with no visual feedback of activity at the control. With task B, subjects used the control to hold a controlled element stationary on a display. Task C was the same as task B, except that subjects had improved visual feedback of movement of the controlled element. Results showed that both 0-5 and 40 Hz vibration caused significant increases in control activity at frequencies of up to about 1 Hz compared with the condition without vibration. With visual feedback in task C, subjects were able to detect drifting of the controlled element on the display and introduced compensatory control activity at frequencies above about 0 2 Hz. The arm support reduced the magnitude of vibration transmitted to the control at 4-0 Hz, but did not otherwise change the results.

Environmental stress, Manual control, Performance, Whole-body vibration
0014-0139
1431-1444
McLeod, R. W.
a8936cb6-07b8-4353-8116-68ab0637e6a2
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
McLeod, R. W.
a8936cb6-07b8-4353-8116-68ab0637e6a2
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

McLeod, R. W. and Griffin, M. J. (1995) Mechanisms of vibration-induced interference with manual control performance. Ergonomics, 38 (7), 1431-1444. (doi:10.1080/00140139508925200).

Record type: Article

Abstract

An experiment is described in which eight subjects performed three simple tasks (A, B and C) in static conditions and during exposure to whole-body vertical (z-axis) vibration at 0-5 and 40 Hz, at an acceleration magnitude of 2-1 ms-2 r.m.s. All subjects performed all conditions with and without an arm support. The objective was to explore the mechanisms that may cause disruption of manual control performance during vibration exposure. With task A subjects simply held a control with no visual feedback of activity at the control. With task B, subjects used the control to hold a controlled element stationary on a display. Task C was the same as task B, except that subjects had improved visual feedback of movement of the controlled element. Results showed that both 0-5 and 40 Hz vibration caused significant increases in control activity at frequencies of up to about 1 Hz compared with the condition without vibration. With visual feedback in task C, subjects were able to detect drifting of the controlled element on the display and introduced compensatory control activity at frequencies above about 0 2 Hz. The arm support reduced the magnitude of vibration transmitted to the control at 4-0 Hz, but did not otherwise change the results.

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More information

Published date: 1 January 1995
Keywords: Environmental stress, Manual control, Performance, Whole-body vibration

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429446
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429446
ISSN: 0014-0139
PURE UUID: 35f70aa5-e41c-4d14-933d-4638c27c9577
ORCID for M. J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 28 Mar 2019 01:37

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