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Effects of fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical whole-body vibration on a head-positioning task

Effects of fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical whole-body vibration on a head-positioning task
Effects of fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical whole-body vibration on a head-positioning task

Background: The performance of tasks in which the head must be positioned close to objects in a moving vehicle may be impeded by the presence of vibration. Hypotheses: It was hypothesized that the extent to which a head positioning task would be impeded by whole-body vibration would depend on the frequency, direction and waveform of the vibration and the posture of the body. Method: There were 12 subjects who participated in a laboratory, experiment in which they judged the difficulty of looking through a pair of sights while exposed to low frequency vibration. We investigated 4 variables: vibration axis (fore-and-aft, lateral, vertical), vibration frequency (11 frequencies in the range 0.5 to 5.0 Hz), vibration waveform (sinusoidal vibration, one-third octave bands of random vibration), seating condition (wearing a 4-point harness, sitting without back support). Results: We found that all variables affected the perceived task difficulty. Frequencies of horizontal vibration in the range 1 to 4 Hz caused most difficulty. Task difficulty was greatest with random vibration, especially with low frequency vibration in the horizontal axes. The wearing of a 4- point harness greatly reduced the perceived task difficulty during exposure to low frequency fore-and-aft vibration but increased task difficulty with higher frequencies of lateral vibration. Conclusions: Increased motion predictability and the provision of suitable support to the upper body (e.g., a harness, back support, front support) can reduce the difficulty of head positioning tasks during exposure to some types of oscillatory motion.

0095-6562
1115-1122
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Brett, M. W.
877a5974-e60f-4b29-b0ed-9d553569d37b
Griffin, M. J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Brett, M. W.
877a5974-e60f-4b29-b0ed-9d553569d37b

Griffin, M. J. and Brett, M. W. (1997) Effects of fore-and-aft, lateral and vertical whole-body vibration on a head-positioning task. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, 68 (12), 1115-1122.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: The performance of tasks in which the head must be positioned close to objects in a moving vehicle may be impeded by the presence of vibration. Hypotheses: It was hypothesized that the extent to which a head positioning task would be impeded by whole-body vibration would depend on the frequency, direction and waveform of the vibration and the posture of the body. Method: There were 12 subjects who participated in a laboratory, experiment in which they judged the difficulty of looking through a pair of sights while exposed to low frequency vibration. We investigated 4 variables: vibration axis (fore-and-aft, lateral, vertical), vibration frequency (11 frequencies in the range 0.5 to 5.0 Hz), vibration waveform (sinusoidal vibration, one-third octave bands of random vibration), seating condition (wearing a 4-point harness, sitting without back support). Results: We found that all variables affected the perceived task difficulty. Frequencies of horizontal vibration in the range 1 to 4 Hz caused most difficulty. Task difficulty was greatest with random vibration, especially with low frequency vibration in the horizontal axes. The wearing of a 4- point harness greatly reduced the perceived task difficulty during exposure to low frequency fore-and-aft vibration but increased task difficulty with higher frequencies of lateral vibration. Conclusions: Increased motion predictability and the provision of suitable support to the upper body (e.g., a harness, back support, front support) can reduce the difficulty of head positioning tasks during exposure to some types of oscillatory motion.

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Published date: 22 December 1997

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429454
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429454
ISSN: 0095-6562
PURE UUID: 1a8a347d-6ce3-4554-a917-cf90ce5f84b4
ORCID for M. J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 27 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:27

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Contributors

Author: M. J. Griffin ORCID iD
Author: M. W. Brett

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