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Effect of direction of head movement on motion sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation

Effect of direction of head movement on motion sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation
Effect of direction of head movement on motion sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation

Background: During constant speed rotation of the body, head rotation about an axis other than the axis of rotation of the body (i.e., Coriolis stimulation) induces motion sickness. Hypotheses: The position of the body relative to the center of rotation will influence the sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation; the direction of head movement will not affect the sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation. Method: There were 24 seated subjects (12 male, 12 female) who made 30° pitch motions of the head every 30 s while rotating about a vertical axis at 10 r.p.m. on a turntable at two separate locations: a) at the center of rotation; and b) 0.75 m from the center of rotation. After each head movement the subjects gave ratings of motion illness. Results: There was no significant difference between illness 0.75 m from the center of rotation and illness at the center of rotation, or between the illness ratings from male and female subjects. Moving the head up from the horizontal caused significantly fewer increases in ratings of motion illness than moving the head back down to the horizontal. Conclusions: Precise location of the body at the center of rotation is not critical during Coriolis stimulation, but the direction of head movement has a large effect on nausea. An influence of somatosensory information on sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation is suggested.

0095-6562
93-98
Woodman, Paul D.
396d6ead-a7d5-438c-9d3d-28b9af292b84
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Woodman, Paul D.
396d6ead-a7d5-438c-9d3d-28b9af292b84
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Woodman, Paul D. and Griffin, Michael J. (1997) Effect of direction of head movement on motion sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, 68 (2), 93-98.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: During constant speed rotation of the body, head rotation about an axis other than the axis of rotation of the body (i.e., Coriolis stimulation) induces motion sickness. Hypotheses: The position of the body relative to the center of rotation will influence the sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation; the direction of head movement will not affect the sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation. Method: There were 24 seated subjects (12 male, 12 female) who made 30° pitch motions of the head every 30 s while rotating about a vertical axis at 10 r.p.m. on a turntable at two separate locations: a) at the center of rotation; and b) 0.75 m from the center of rotation. After each head movement the subjects gave ratings of motion illness. Results: There was no significant difference between illness 0.75 m from the center of rotation and illness at the center of rotation, or between the illness ratings from male and female subjects. Moving the head up from the horizontal caused significantly fewer increases in ratings of motion illness than moving the head back down to the horizontal. Conclusions: Precise location of the body at the center of rotation is not critical during Coriolis stimulation, but the direction of head movement has a large effect on nausea. An influence of somatosensory information on sickness caused by Coriolis stimulation is suggested.

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Published date: 1 February 1997

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429455
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429455
ISSN: 0095-6562
PURE UUID: 5eb9547c-769b-47e0-9005-73f7ed21f4e1
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 27 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:27

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