The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Magnitude of acute exposures to vibration and finger circulation

Magnitude of acute exposures to vibration and finger circulation
Magnitude of acute exposures to vibration and finger circulation

Objectives. Changes in finger circulation were studied during and after acute exposure to increasing magnitudes of hand-transmitted vibration. Methods. Finger skin temperature (FST) and finger blood flow (FBF) were measured in the middle fingers of both hands of 10 healthy men. The right hand was exposed for 15 minutes to 125-Hz vibration with acceleration magnitudes of either 5.5, 22, 44, or 62 m/s2 root-mean-square. The measures of finger circulation were taken before the vibration, at fixed intervals during exposure, and during a 45-minute recovery period. Results The FST did not change during vibration exposure, whereas vibration of any magnitude provoked significant reductions in the FBF of the vibrated finger when compared with the preexposure FBF and the contralateral (nonvibrated finger) FBF. Vasoconstrictor aftereffects (ie, during recovery) were observed in both fingers after the end of exposure to vibration magnitudes greater than 22 m/s2 root-mean-square. The higher the vibration magnitude, the stronger the reduction of FBF in either finger during both vibration exposure and the recovery period. This effect was stronger in the vibrated finger than in the nonvibrated finger during both periods. Conclusions. Acute exposure to 125-Hz vibration can reduce FBF in both the vibrated and the nonvibrated finger, and the degree of digital vasoconstriction is related to the magnitude of the vibration. The pattern of the hemodynamic changes during and after vibration exposure suggests that complex vasomotor mechanisms are involved in the response of digital vessels to acute vibration.

Acceleration magnitude, Acute vibration, Digital vasoconstriction, Finger blood flow, Vasomotor effects
0355-3140
278-284
Bovenzi, Massimo
fc8fbd59-6c3f-46f1-b8f5-2a00b759857c
Lindsell, Christopher J.
b724b896-71a8-4afa-9d3f-d153d63a963b
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Bovenzi, Massimo
fc8fbd59-6c3f-46f1-b8f5-2a00b759857c
Lindsell, Christopher J.
b724b896-71a8-4afa-9d3f-d153d63a963b
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Bovenzi, Massimo, Lindsell, Christopher J. and Griffin, Michael J. (1999) Magnitude of acute exposures to vibration and finger circulation. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 25 (3), 278-284. (doi:10.5271/sjweh.435).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives. Changes in finger circulation were studied during and after acute exposure to increasing magnitudes of hand-transmitted vibration. Methods. Finger skin temperature (FST) and finger blood flow (FBF) were measured in the middle fingers of both hands of 10 healthy men. The right hand was exposed for 15 minutes to 125-Hz vibration with acceleration magnitudes of either 5.5, 22, 44, or 62 m/s2 root-mean-square. The measures of finger circulation were taken before the vibration, at fixed intervals during exposure, and during a 45-minute recovery period. Results The FST did not change during vibration exposure, whereas vibration of any magnitude provoked significant reductions in the FBF of the vibrated finger when compared with the preexposure FBF and the contralateral (nonvibrated finger) FBF. Vasoconstrictor aftereffects (ie, during recovery) were observed in both fingers after the end of exposure to vibration magnitudes greater than 22 m/s2 root-mean-square. The higher the vibration magnitude, the stronger the reduction of FBF in either finger during both vibration exposure and the recovery period. This effect was stronger in the vibrated finger than in the nonvibrated finger during both periods. Conclusions. Acute exposure to 125-Hz vibration can reduce FBF in both the vibrated and the nonvibrated finger, and the degree of digital vasoconstriction is related to the magnitude of the vibration. The pattern of the hemodynamic changes during and after vibration exposure suggests that complex vasomotor mechanisms are involved in the response of digital vessels to acute vibration.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1999
Keywords: Acceleration magnitude, Acute vibration, Digital vasoconstriction, Finger blood flow, Vasomotor effects

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429463
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429463
ISSN: 0355-3140
PURE UUID: db51b002-d916-42bf-84f0-47d532511737
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 02:49

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×