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Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature and brain function

Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature and brain function
Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature and brain function

A debate has emerged in recently published studies about the optimum cardiopulmonary bypass temperature for good neurological outcome - warm vs. cold, i.e. normothermic vs. hypothermic. Although many comparative studies have been performed, the results of these studies are inconclusive and are difficult to interpret. Brain function has been studied in terms of neurological and neuropsychological outcome, protein S100β levels as a marker of brain damage, and cerebral oxygenation using jugular bulb oximetry and near-infrared spectroscopy. The studies produce no conclusive proof of the superiority of warm or cold cardiopulmonary bypass. However, it appears that any degree of bypass hypothermia (< 35 °C) may protect the brain. On the other hand, even a slight increase in bypass temperature to > 37 °C may cause marked brain injury.

0003-2409
365-372
Shaaban Ali, M.
deaf3f30-6f54-46df-a2ce-c7dfe973595d
Harmer, M.
e38c025d-79c5-41c5-a0c8-4e5aaa77ef59
Kirkham, F.
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58
Shaaban Ali, M.
deaf3f30-6f54-46df-a2ce-c7dfe973595d
Harmer, M.
e38c025d-79c5-41c5-a0c8-4e5aaa77ef59
Kirkham, F.
1dfbc0d5-aebe-4439-9fb2-dac6503bcd58

Shaaban Ali, M., Harmer, M. and Kirkham, F. (2005) Cardiopulmonary bypass temperature and brain function. Anaesthesia, 60 (4), 365-372. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-2044.2005.04112.x).

Record type: Review

Abstract

A debate has emerged in recently published studies about the optimum cardiopulmonary bypass temperature for good neurological outcome - warm vs. cold, i.e. normothermic vs. hypothermic. Although many comparative studies have been performed, the results of these studies are inconclusive and are difficult to interpret. Brain function has been studied in terms of neurological and neuropsychological outcome, protein S100β levels as a marker of brain damage, and cerebral oxygenation using jugular bulb oximetry and near-infrared spectroscopy. The studies produce no conclusive proof of the superiority of warm or cold cardiopulmonary bypass. However, it appears that any degree of bypass hypothermia (< 35 °C) may protect the brain. On the other hand, even a slight increase in bypass temperature to > 37 °C may cause marked brain injury.

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Published date: April 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429533
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429533
ISSN: 0003-2409
PURE UUID: 5cff95d6-8778-40d4-ac0c-f26088682d3e
ORCID for F. Kirkham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2443-7958

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Date deposited: 28 Mar 2019 17:30
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:52

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Contributors

Author: M. Shaaban Ali
Author: M. Harmer
Author: F. Kirkham ORCID iD

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