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Development of a measure of collective efficacy within personal networks: A complement to self-efficacy in self-management support?

Development of a measure of collective efficacy within personal networks: A complement to self-efficacy in self-management support?
Development of a measure of collective efficacy within personal networks: A complement to self-efficacy in self-management support?

Objective: To develop and evaluate the Collective Efficacy of Networks (CENS) questionnaire to measure perceived collective efficacy within personal social networks. Methods: A mixed methods approach was used, guided by theory and with extensive input from adults with long-term conditions who completed the initial questionnaire (n = 78) with test-retest assessed at 2 weeks (n = 68). A second sample (n = 85) completed a postal questionnaire including CENS, theoretically linked constructs (self-efficacy, social support) and health outcomes (loneliness, mental and physical health). Results: Principal components analysis demonstrated a two-factor structure with 12-items selected to represent Network responsiveness (8 items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.896) and Access to collective efficacy (4 items, Cronbach's alpha =.773). Good test-retest reliability was established for both subscales (r icc =.793–.853). Network responsiveness was associated with self-efficacy (r = 342, p =. < 001) and social support (r =.407, p <.001) and predicted reduced loneliness. Access to collective efficacy significantly predicted better mental health; the predictive validity of the subscales improved when combined with self-efficacy. Conclusion: The CENS is an acceptable and psychometrically robust measure of collective efficacy in personal social networks. Practice implications: Measuring collective efficacy with self-efficacy will provide useful information for researchers and policymakers interested in capacity for self-management and social determinants of behaviour change.

Assessment, Collective efficacy, Personal communities, Psychometric evaluation, Social networks
0738-3991
Band, Rebecca
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James, Elizabeth
b7e90b5a-da45-4459-ae84-150adc07e988
Culliford, David
25511573-74d3-422a-b0ee-dfe60f80df87
Dimitrov, Borislav
366d715f-ffd9-45a1-8415-65de5488472f
Kennedy, Anne
e059c1c7-d6d0-41c8-95e1-95e5273b07f8
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3
Band, Rebecca
be8901bb-bb1b-4131-8e19-c1d4a3bdfb8d
James, Elizabeth
b7e90b5a-da45-4459-ae84-150adc07e988
Culliford, David
25511573-74d3-422a-b0ee-dfe60f80df87
Dimitrov, Borislav
366d715f-ffd9-45a1-8415-65de5488472f
Kennedy, Anne
e059c1c7-d6d0-41c8-95e1-95e5273b07f8
Rogers, Anne
105eeebc-1899-4850-950e-385a51738eb7
Vassilev, Ivaylo
d76a5531-4ddc-4eb2-909b-a2a1068f05f3

Band, Rebecca, James, Elizabeth, Culliford, David, Dimitrov, Borislav, Kennedy, Anne, Rogers, Anne and Vassilev, Ivaylo (2019) Development of a measure of collective efficacy within personal networks: A complement to self-efficacy in self-management support? Patient Education and Counseling. (doi:10.1016/j.pec.2019.02.026).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: To develop and evaluate the Collective Efficacy of Networks (CENS) questionnaire to measure perceived collective efficacy within personal social networks. Methods: A mixed methods approach was used, guided by theory and with extensive input from adults with long-term conditions who completed the initial questionnaire (n = 78) with test-retest assessed at 2 weeks (n = 68). A second sample (n = 85) completed a postal questionnaire including CENS, theoretically linked constructs (self-efficacy, social support) and health outcomes (loneliness, mental and physical health). Results: Principal components analysis demonstrated a two-factor structure with 12-items selected to represent Network responsiveness (8 items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.896) and Access to collective efficacy (4 items, Cronbach's alpha =.773). Good test-retest reliability was established for both subscales (r icc =.793–.853). Network responsiveness was associated with self-efficacy (r = 342, p =. < 001) and social support (r =.407, p <.001) and predicted reduced loneliness. Access to collective efficacy significantly predicted better mental health; the predictive validity of the subscales improved when combined with self-efficacy. Conclusion: The CENS is an acceptable and psychometrically robust measure of collective efficacy in personal social networks. Practice implications: Measuring collective efficacy with self-efficacy will provide useful information for researchers and policymakers interested in capacity for self-management and social determinants of behaviour change.

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Accepted/In Press date: 28 February 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 March 2019
Keywords: Assessment, Collective efficacy, Personal communities, Psychometric evaluation, Social networks

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Local EPrints ID: 429631
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429631
ISSN: 0738-3991
PURE UUID: a3b83087-9577-4d41-b831-e16aa908d439
ORCID for Rebecca Band: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5403-1708
ORCID for Elizabeth James: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9355-0295
ORCID for David Culliford: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1663-0253
ORCID for Anne Kennedy: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4570-9104

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Date deposited: 02 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:35

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Contributors

Author: Rebecca Band ORCID iD
Author: Elizabeth James ORCID iD
Author: David Culliford ORCID iD
Author: Borislav Dimitrov
Author: Anne Kennedy ORCID iD
Author: Anne Rogers
Author: Ivaylo Vassilev

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