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Evaluating the impact of declining tsetse fly (Glossina pallidipes) habitat in the Zambezi valley of Zimbabwe

Evaluating the impact of declining tsetse fly (Glossina pallidipes) habitat in the Zambezi valley of Zimbabwe
Evaluating the impact of declining tsetse fly (Glossina pallidipes) habitat in the Zambezi valley of Zimbabwe

Tsetse flies transmit trypanosomes that cause Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) in humans and African Animal Trypanosomiasis (AAT) in animals. Understanding historical trends in the spatial distribution of tsetse fly habitat is necessary for planning vector control measures. The objectives of this study were (i) to test for evidence of any trends in suitable tsetse fly habitat and (ii) to test whether there is an association between trypanosomiasis detected from livestock sampled in dip tanks and local tsetse habitat in the project area. Results indicate a significant decreasing trend in the amount of suitable habitat. There is no significant correlation between trypanosomiasis prevalence rates in cattle and distance from patches of suitable tsetse habitat. The observed low trypanosomiasis prevalence and the lack of dependence on suitable tsetse fly habitat can be explained by the observed decreases in suitable tsetse habitat, which themselves are due to expansion of settlement and agriculture in North Western Zimbabwe.

Mann–Kendall trend test, prevalence, trypanosomiasis, tsetse fly habitat, Vegetation cover
1010-6049
Matawa, Farai
47ba3b43-95ee-4f11-8fee-bf3cc53b1254
Murwira, Amon
4892a607-76aa-47a1-8e0d-00e7f68b4ac7
Atkinson, Peter M.
96e96579-56fe-424d-a21c-17b6eed13b0b
Matawa, Farai
47ba3b43-95ee-4f11-8fee-bf3cc53b1254
Murwira, Amon
4892a607-76aa-47a1-8e0d-00e7f68b4ac7
Atkinson, Peter M.
96e96579-56fe-424d-a21c-17b6eed13b0b

Matawa, Farai, Murwira, Amon and Atkinson, Peter M. (2019) Evaluating the impact of declining tsetse fly (Glossina pallidipes) habitat in the Zambezi valley of Zimbabwe. Geocarto International. (doi:10.1080/10106049.2019.1576780).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Tsetse flies transmit trypanosomes that cause Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) in humans and African Animal Trypanosomiasis (AAT) in animals. Understanding historical trends in the spatial distribution of tsetse fly habitat is necessary for planning vector control measures. The objectives of this study were (i) to test for evidence of any trends in suitable tsetse fly habitat and (ii) to test whether there is an association between trypanosomiasis detected from livestock sampled in dip tanks and local tsetse habitat in the project area. Results indicate a significant decreasing trend in the amount of suitable habitat. There is no significant correlation between trypanosomiasis prevalence rates in cattle and distance from patches of suitable tsetse habitat. The observed low trypanosomiasis prevalence and the lack of dependence on suitable tsetse fly habitat can be explained by the observed decreases in suitable tsetse habitat, which themselves are due to expansion of settlement and agriculture in North Western Zimbabwe.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 January 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 March 2019
Keywords: Mann–Kendall trend test, prevalence, trypanosomiasis, tsetse fly habitat, Vegetation cover

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429655
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429655
ISSN: 1010-6049
PURE UUID: 4037d34b-1ae7-4546-ad62-03403fd0062e
ORCID for Peter M. Atkinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5489-6880

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:20

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