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Asthma, urticaria and less rare than expected FPIES

Asthma, urticaria and less rare than expected FPIES
Asthma, urticaria and less rare than expected FPIES
Recently in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Szefler et al1 have assessed whether once‐daily inhaled tiotropium might improve asthma control in young school‐aged children with severe symptomatic asthma. In a randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled trial of 401 participants, the higher 5 mg dose increased peak FEV1 by 139 mL. While the result is interesting, it is not an outcome measure that a patient would recognize. Unfortunately, as a 12‐week trial, it was probably not long enough to provide data on relevant patient‐orientated outcome measures such as exacerbations or quality of life. Also in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Mehr et al2 have provided some population data for the prevalence of food protein‐induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES). Using an Australia‐wide survey via the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, where paediatrics notify cases on a monthly basis, 230 infants with FPIES were identified. This gave an incidence of FPIES in Australian infants aged less than 24 months of 15.4/100 000/year. Commoner than expected.
0954-7894
1510-1511
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3

Roberts, Graham (2017) Asthma, urticaria and less rare than expected FPIES. Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 47 (12), 1510-1511. (doi:10.1111/cea.13059).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recently in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Szefler et al1 have assessed whether once‐daily inhaled tiotropium might improve asthma control in young school‐aged children with severe symptomatic asthma. In a randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled trial of 401 participants, the higher 5 mg dose increased peak FEV1 by 139 mL. While the result is interesting, it is not an outcome measure that a patient would recognize. Unfortunately, as a 12‐week trial, it was probably not long enough to provide data on relevant patient‐orientated outcome measures such as exacerbations or quality of life. Also in Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Mehr et al2 have provided some population data for the prevalence of food protein‐induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES). Using an Australia‐wide survey via the Australian Paediatric Surveillance Unit, where paediatrics notify cases on a monthly basis, 230 infants with FPIES were identified. This gave an incidence of FPIES in Australian infants aged less than 24 months of 15.4/100 000/year. Commoner than expected.

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More information

Published date: December 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429711
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429711
ISSN: 0954-7894
PURE UUID: 19bcb350-5fdd-4114-983e-f609371540d2
ORCID for Graham Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2252-1248

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 03:13

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