The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Postprandial incorporation of EPA and DHA from transgenic Camelina sativa oil into blood lipids is equivalent to that from fish oil in healthy humans

Postprandial incorporation of EPA and DHA from transgenic Camelina sativa oil into blood lipids is equivalent to that from fish oil in healthy humans
Postprandial incorporation of EPA and DHA from transgenic Camelina sativa oil into blood lipids is equivalent to that from fish oil in healthy humans
Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are important components of cell membranes. Since humans have limited ability for EPA and DHA synthesis, these must be obtained from the diet, primarily from oily fish. Dietary EPA and DHA intakes are constrained by the size of fish stocks and by food choice. Seed oil from transgenic plants that synthesise EPA and DHA represents a potential alternative source of these fatty acids, but this has not been tested in humans. We hypothesised that incorporation of EPA and DHA into blood lipids from transgenic Camelina sativa seed oil (CSO) is equivalent to that from fish oil. Healthy men and women (18 to 30 years or 50 to 65 years) consumed 450 mg EPA plus DHA from either CSO or commercial blended fish oil (BFO) in test meals in a double blind, postprandial cross-over trial. There were no significant differences between test oils or sexes in EPA and DHA incorporation into plasma triacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine or non-esterified fatty acids over 8 hours. There were no significant differences between test oils, age groups or sexes in postprandial VLDL, LDL or HDL sizes or concentrations. There were no significant differences between test oils in postprandial plasma TNFα, interleukin 6 or 10, or soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 concentrations in younger participants. These findings show that incorporation into blood lipids of EPA and DHA consumed as CSO was equivalent to BFO and that such transgenic plant oils are a suitable dietary source of EPA and DHA in humans.
0007-1145
1235-1246
West, Annette
c1923242-802f-4331-b743-31de45d3883c
Miles, Elizabeth
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Lillycrop, Karen
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Han, Lilua
84538a07-a7ac-46ad-b018-a584181ec1fd
Sayanova, Olga
94cdbfaa-cc3a-4216-bae7-56a17dd8b3f4
Napier, Johnathan
b3c688c3-f270-4ebb-b9a7-250011c8a960
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Burdge, Graham
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
West, Annette
c1923242-802f-4331-b743-31de45d3883c
Miles, Elizabeth
20332899-ecdb-4214-95bc-922dde36d416
Lillycrop, Karen
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Han, Lilua
84538a07-a7ac-46ad-b018-a584181ec1fd
Sayanova, Olga
94cdbfaa-cc3a-4216-bae7-56a17dd8b3f4
Napier, Johnathan
b3c688c3-f270-4ebb-b9a7-250011c8a960
Calder, Philip
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Burdge, Graham
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159

West, Annette, Miles, Elizabeth, Lillycrop, Karen, Han, Lilua, Sayanova, Olga, Napier, Johnathan, Calder, Philip and Burdge, Graham (2019) Postprandial incorporation of EPA and DHA from transgenic Camelina sativa oil into blood lipids is equivalent to that from fish oil in healthy humans. British Journal of Nutrition, 121 (1), 1235-1246. (doi:10.1017/S0007114519000825).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids are important components of cell membranes. Since humans have limited ability for EPA and DHA synthesis, these must be obtained from the diet, primarily from oily fish. Dietary EPA and DHA intakes are constrained by the size of fish stocks and by food choice. Seed oil from transgenic plants that synthesise EPA and DHA represents a potential alternative source of these fatty acids, but this has not been tested in humans. We hypothesised that incorporation of EPA and DHA into blood lipids from transgenic Camelina sativa seed oil (CSO) is equivalent to that from fish oil. Healthy men and women (18 to 30 years or 50 to 65 years) consumed 450 mg EPA plus DHA from either CSO or commercial blended fish oil (BFO) in test meals in a double blind, postprandial cross-over trial. There were no significant differences between test oils or sexes in EPA and DHA incorporation into plasma triacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine or non-esterified fatty acids over 8 hours. There were no significant differences between test oils, age groups or sexes in postprandial VLDL, LDL or HDL sizes or concentrations. There were no significant differences between test oils in postprandial plasma TNFα, interleukin 6 or 10, or soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 concentrations in younger participants. These findings show that incorporation into blood lipids of EPA and DHA consumed as CSO was equivalent to BFO and that such transgenic plant oils are a suitable dietary source of EPA and DHA in humans.

Text
Postprandial paper Accepted Version - Accepted Manuscript
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (880kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 March 2019
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 April 2019
Published date: 1 June 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 429720
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/429720
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: cafb5ced-6582-4323-b60a-e7706a4203c6
ORCID for Annette West: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3331-0684
ORCID for Elizabeth Miles: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8643-0655
ORCID for Karen Lillycrop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7350-5489
ORCID for Philip Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X
ORCID for Graham Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Apr 2019 16:30
Last modified: 10 Jan 2022 02:49

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Annette West ORCID iD
Author: Elizabeth Miles ORCID iD
Author: Karen Lillycrop ORCID iD
Author: Lilua Han
Author: Olga Sayanova
Author: Johnathan Napier
Author: Philip Calder ORCID iD
Author: Graham Burdge ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×